Centennial History of Moses Brown School, 1819-1919 (Google eBook)

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Moses Brown school, 1919 - Moses Brown school - 175 pages
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Page 151 - All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness : That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.
Page 2 - ... and it is further ordered, that where any town shall increase to the number of one hundred families or householders they shall set up a grammar school, the master thereof being able to instruct youth so far as they may be fitted for the university...
Page 2 - ... to take account from time to time of all parents and masters and of their children, concerning their calling and employment of their children, especially of their ability to read and understand the principles of religion and the capital laws of this country...
Page 2 - It is therefore ordered, that every township in this jurisdiction, after the Lord hath increased them to the number of fifty householders, shall then forthwith appoint one within their town to teach all such children as shall resort to him to write and read...
Page 46 - School has been renewedly brought under my consideration. And believing that a permanent institution for a guarded education of the rising generation will be promotive of their usefulness in society and the honor of truth, I have, for the furtherance of these desirable objects, concluded to give a tract of land on the west part of my homestead farm, containing about forty-three acres, for the purpose of erecting suitable buildings for the Boarding School thereon; provided the Meeting should consider...
Page 143 - To habituate children from their early infancy, to silence and attention, is of the greatest advantage to them, not only as a preparative to their advancement in a religious life, but as the groundwork of a well-cultivated understanding. To have the active minds of children put under a kind of restraint to be accustomed to turn their attention from external objects, and habituated to a degree of abstracted quiet, is a matter of great consequence, and lasting benefit to them. Although it cannot...
Page 115 - I need not tell thee, that I have no scruples against music as an art, or natural gift. It is innocent enough in itself, but it may be abused or misdirected, as in corrupting, sensuous compositions and songs or in military matters. I see nothing in it more inconsistent with Quakerism, than poetry, rhetoric, or painting. We both think the old Quaker testimony against it, as a form of worship, is right.
Page 7 - Friends concerned (so far as they are able, or may be capable), to provide schoolmasters and mistresses who are faithful Friends, to teach and instruct their children. And not to send them to such schools where they are taught the corrupt ways, manners, fashions, and language of the world, and of the heathen in their authors, and names of the heathenish gods and goddesses ; tending greatly to corrupt and alienate the minds of children into an averseness or opposition against the truth, and the simplicity...
Page 46 - FOR SUFFERINGS, Dear friends: As my feeble state of health prevents my attending the Meeting at this time, I thought best to inform you, that in the course of my confinement by bodily indisposition for some time past, the subject of the Yearly Meeting's School has been renewedly brought under my consideration, and believing that a permanent institution for a guarded education of the rising generation will be promotive of their usefulness in society and the honor of Truth. I have for the furtherance...
Page 46 - Mo., 1814. To the Meeting for Sufferings: DEAR FRIENDS: As my feeble state of health prevents my attending the Meeting at this time, I thought best to inform you that in the course of my confinement by bodily indisposition for some time past, the subject of the Yearly Meeting's School has been reuewedly brought under my consideration.

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