Peter Parley's Universal History on the Basis of Geography (Google eBook)

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Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor, & Company, 1886 - World history - 718 pages
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Contents

How Noah and his family came out of the ark How the people settled in the land of Shinar About Babel
32
The great Assyrian empire and reign of queen Semiramis
37
Queen Semiramis sets forth to conquer the world but is de feated by the king of the Indies
40
About Ninias Reign of Sardanapalus and fall of the Assyrian empire
43
About the Hebrews or Jews Origin of the Jews The re moval of Jacob and his children to Egypt
45
The bondage in Egypt Flight of the Hebrews and destruc tion of Pharaoh and his host
49
About the wanderings of the Israelites in the wilderness
54
The Hebrews overthrow the Midianites Samson judge of Israel
58
Beginning of the reign of Saul
62
Combat of David and Goliah
64
The reign of David Wisdom of Solomon
67
XIXBuilding of the temple Visit of the queen of Sheba
70
The decline of the Jewish natiou
73
The Hebrew prophets
77
Crucifixion of the Saviour Destruction of Jerusalem
81
Cyrus conquers Babylon His death
85
Reign of Cambyses
88
Expedition of Xerxes into Greece
90
Chapter Paw XXVI Affairs of Persia till the Saracen conquest
93
XXVIIModern history of Persia
96
Karly history of China
101
XXIXAnecdotes of the Chinese emperors Confucius Moder n history of China
104
Cities of China Manners of the Chinese
108
History of Japan
111
Origin of the Arabs Riso of Mahomet
114
Sequel of the history of the Arabs or Saracens
117
About Syria Phoenicia and Asia Minor
120
A brief view of several nations
125
XXXVLReview of the history of Asia
128
Chronology of Asia
133
AFRICA
136
About the geography of Africa The inhabitants
137
XXXIXEarly sovereigns of Kgypt
141
Egyptian architecture and sculpture
145
The Ptolemies and queen Cleopatra
149
Sequel of the Egyptian history
154
Summary of Ethiopian matters
156
Origin of the Barbary states and their piracies on the Christians
159
Fables and facts about Africa
162
History of the slave trade
165
Chronology of Africa
167
EUROPE
168
Introductory remarks on its geography and other matters
170
About Greece where it is situated appearance of the coun try climate
176
Tho extent of Greece First settlement of the country
180
The Grecian lawgivers
183
LIIWar with Persia
186
LIIIAffairs of Athens
189
Beginning of the Theban war
193
Sequel of the Theban war
195
Grecian religion or mythology
198
LVIIThe Grecian philosophers
203
Something more about philosophers About the Greek poets
207
About the mode of life among the ancient Greeks
210
Philip of Macedon conquers Greece
215
Conquests of Alexander the Great
218
Sequel of Alexanders career
221
Curat Pab LXIV End of Grecian independence
227
Modern history of Greece
230
Greece invaded by the Gauls
233
About Italy as it now is
235
Founding of Rome by Romulus Its early state
239
Battle of the Horatii and the Curiatii
243
From the reign of Ancus Martius till the expulsion of the kings
246
The story of Coriolanus
250
LXX1I Home invadod by the Gauls The first Punic war
253
Second and third Punic wars
257
Scipios triumph
260
LXXVSylla and Marius
263
Cneius Pompey and Julius Caesar
265
Csesar usurps the supreme power
268
LXXVIILAssassination of Julius Csesar
270
Consequences of Caisars death
273
About the great power and extent of the Roman empire in the time of Augustus
277
The means by which Rome acquired its power
281
LXXXJI Rome under the emperors
284
Fall of the western empire of the Romans
287
LXXXIVProgress of the decline of Rome
291
Manners and customs of the ancient Romans
294
About religion Deities Temples Marriages
296
About funeral rites and ceremonies
299
Roman farms Mode of ploughing Farmhouses Grain Cattle Superstitions of the farmers Vines Country houses Aqueducts
304
Military affairs of the Romans Division of the army The imperial eagle Music Arms Dress Military rewards Crowns The triumph
309
About naval affairs The wargalley Commerce Shows of wild beasts Exhibitions of gladiators
314
Sports Chariotracing The circus Carriages Private entertainments Supperrooms Convivial parties Luxu ries Clocks Fine arts Books Costume
318
Rome under the popes
323
The kingdom of Italy
329
Chronology of Rome
333
About the Ottoman empire Turkey in Europe Turkey in Asia About the climate people and other things
335
About the Saracens How the Turks overturned the Saracen empire How the Ottoman Turks founded the Ottoman empire About Bajazet Timour and ...
338
Sequel of the Turkish history
342
Chapter Faob XCVIII Early history of Spain The Moorish conquest
346
XCTX Wars between the Moors and the Spaniards
350
The Spanish Inquisition
353
The Invincible Armada Curious death of a Spanish king Becent affairs of Spain
356
CXAbout the Feudal System
386
About chivalry or knighterrantry
391
More about chivalry
395
CXI1I King Philip and pope Boniface Wars of the French and English
398
The reigns of several French kings
403
The reigns of Louis the Grand and his successor
406
The French Revolution
410
The rise of Napoleon Bonaparte
415
The fall of Napoleon Bonaparte
417
CXIXLater Revolutions in Franco Napoleon III
420
Chronology of France
424
About the German Empire
425
CXXILAbout the ancient tribes of Germany Charlemagne etc
427
Affairs of Switzerland
432
Sequel of German history
436
About Austria Hungary etc
439
About Hungary Bohemia the Tyrol etc
442
CXXVTLAbout Prussia
445
More about Prussia Frederic the Great
447
Chronology of Germany Austria Hungary and Prussia
451
Description of Russia
455
The reign of Peter the Great
459
The successors of Peter the Great
462
About Sweden
466
Charles tho Twelfth and his successors
469
About Lapland Norway and Denmark
472
QXXXVII Brief notices of several kingdoms and states
476
Chiptee Pio CXXXVIII Chronology of Russia Sweden Lapland Norway Denmark Holland Belgium etc
479
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
481
About London and other cities of England Wales Scotland and Ireland
484
Origin of the British nation The Druids
488
Saxon and Danish kings of England
491
Norman kings of England
494
English wars and rebellions 49
497
OXLV The Lancastrian kings of England
501
Wars of the Roses
504
CXLVI1 Reigns of the Tudor princes
507
The reign of Elizabeth
511
CXLIXAccession of the House of Stuart
515
Wars of the king and parliament 618
518
The Protectorate and the Restoration
522
The Revolution of 1688 and other matters
525
CL1II The Hanoverian kings of Great Britain
528
CUV The story of Wales
532
CLVThe story of Scotland
538
About Ireland
542
About various matters and things
547
CLVI1I Chronology of Great Britain
550
Review The dark ages Important inventions etc
551
About America
559
The first inhabitants of America
565
Discovery of America by Columbus
568
A few words about Iceland and Greenland Settlements of the French in America
573
CLXrV The French colonies conquered by the English
577
Description of the United States
580
Settlement and colonial history of New England 532
582
Affairs of New England continued
585
CLXVIIIEarly history of Virginia
589
OLXIX Braddocks defeat and other matters
592
CLXXCauses which led to the Revolution
595
Account of the battle of Lexington
598
CLXXIIThe battle of Bunker Hill
602
Progress of the war Capture of Burgoyne
603
The story of the traitor Arnold and Major Andre1
606
War in the South Surrender of Cornwallis
608
The Presidents
611
The Presidents continued
617
About Slavery and Secession
622
The War of Secession continued
629
The War of Secession concluded The Abolition of Slavery
633
Events since the War
638
General remarks upon the history of the United States
641
continued
643
About South America El Dorado and the Fountain of Youth
649
History of the Mexican territories Guatemala
652
Spanish Peruvian territories
656
Account of the Brazilian territories
658
The West Indies
661
CXCThe West Indies continued
664
The West Indies concluded
667
Chronology of America
671
About Oceanica The Malaysian Islands
672
The Australasian division of Oceanica
675
Polynesia The Sandwich Islands
678
Polynesia continued The Society Islands The Bounty
681
Story of the Bounty concluded
685
CXCIII Chronology of Oceanica
688
The origin and progress of government
690
CCIArchitecture Commerce
694
CC1I Origin and progress of various arts
703
Dates of discoveries and inventions
709
Important Dates
712
Origin of States Kingdoms Empires etc
713
Celebrated Characters
715

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 318 - In the centre was a barrier of twelve feet in breadth, and four feet high, around which the race was performed; and at one end was a triumphal arch, 'through which the successful charioteer drove, followed by the shouts and applause of the assembly.
Page 101 - HISTORY OF CHINA. 1. THE territory of the Chinese empire is nearly the same at the present day that it has been from the earliest records. It is bounded on the north by Asiatic Russia, on the east by the Pacific Ocean, and on the south by the Chinese Sea and Farther India. On the west there are mountains and sandy deserts, which divide it from Thibet and Tartary. 2. This empire is very ancient, and has continued longer than any other that has evw existed.
Page 462 - EUROPE continued. THE SUCCESSORS OF PETER THE GREAT. 1. PETER died in 1725, at the age of fifty-three, and was succeeded by his wife, the Empress Catherine. She had been a country girl, and the Czar Peter had married her for the sake of her beauty. In some respects, Catherine was a good sort of woman ; but, among other faults, she was rather too fond of wine. 2. She reigned only about two years, and was succeeded by her husband's grandson, named Peter the Second. He died in 1730, and left the throne...
Page 108 - THE CHINESE. 1. I MUST now give you a short account of the cities and people of China as they are at this day. Nankin was formerly the capital of China. Pekin which contains two millions of inhabitants, is now the capital. The emperor's palace stands in a part of Pekin called the Tartar city. 2. The walls of Pekin are built of brick, and are nearly one hundred feet high, so that they hide the whole city. They are so thick that sentinels on horseback ride round the city on the top of the walls. There...
Page 320 - At great entertainments the supper room was hung with flowers, and the guests were crowned with garlands. The floor was generally bare, though richly ornamented, and the ceiling was inlaid with a fretwork of gold and ivory. Scented oil was used for lighting the apartments, and massive carved lamps of figured bronze reflected their brilliancy on the gay and beautiful scene. , 12. Some of the more voluptuous and degraded of the Roman emperors, in the decay of the republic, were most extravagant and...
Page 414 - ascend to heaven ! " 16. Down came the axe of the guillotine, and the head that had worn a crown was severed from the body! The blood of a kingly race gushed out upon the scaffold. Thus the crimes and misused power of many kings had brought vengeance on their innocent descendants.
Page 98 - The climate of Persia is mild, and the country abounds in beautiful and fragrant trees, shrubs, and flowers. The people are less warlike than in former times. The rich live in splendid palaces, and the poor in mud huts.
Page 694 - ... their temporary shelter, the same structure, with all its prominent features, has been afterwards kept up by their refined and opulent posterity. Thus the Egyptian style of building has its origin in the cavern and mound ; the Chinese architecture is modelled from the tent; the Grecian is derived from the wooden cabin; and the Gothic, from the bower of trees.
Page 309 - THE TRIUMPH. 1. You know that the Romans were almost continually engaged in wars. Their military affairs, therefore, occupied the attention of the most distinguished citizens. According to the Roman laws, every free-born citizen was a soldier, and bound to serve in the army at any period from the age of seventeen to that of forty-six. 2. The Roman forces were divided into legions, each of which originally consisted of three thousand foot soldiers, and three hundred horsemen, but afterwards varied...
Page 477 - Many of the cities are very interesting. 4. The Netherlands, or Holland and Belgium, were formerly one country. The whole territory is bounded on the north by the North Sea, east by Germany, south by France, and west by the British Channel and the North Sea. These territories belonged at one time to Rome, afterwards to Germany, and finally to Spain. 5. In 1581, the seven northern provinces revolted against Philip of Spain, and formed themselves into a republic, which was then called Holland. During...

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