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Pan Macmillan, 1998 - American wit and humor - 473 pages
51 Reviews
Although Woody Allen is best known for his cult movies, he is also a writer of outstanding wit and skill. Dip into this collection of fifty-two pieces for hilarity, deadpan weirdness, and some extremely outlandish ideas. Do you want to hear about the time Hitler went for a haircut? Or why Woody reveres Socrates? Have you ever wondered what would have happened if the Impressionists had actually been dentists? You can learn much about history - the piece on the invention of sandwiches is eye-opening - or modern life in this laugh-out-loud collection of thoughts, observations, diaries and stories from one of the most original minds and wonderfully comic voices of our time. 'It's no secret that Allen's short stories are just as entertaining and accomplished as his films . . . Allen's witty stories satirise contemporary society and classic modern literature in a style that is characteristically breathless, off the cuff and brilliant' Observer

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Wickedly funny prose. - Goodreads
The complete prose of my husband, Woody Allen. - Goodreads
... a prose now and then, to be felt. - Goodreads
just for ending the day..;))... - Goodreads

Review: The Complete Prose

User Review  - Gerald Thomson - Goodreads

Woody Allen's prose provides the perfect balance between bizarre situations and absurd outcomes. His humor writing has inspired me, and many in my generation, for years. If you are looking for light reading with existential meaning, you have found it. Read full review

Review: The Complete Prose

User Review  - Endre Bakken Stovner - Goodreads

Allen's movies are mostly turkeys with the occasional streak of genius. In this short story collection the ratio is inverted. His imitations of famous artists like Dostoyevsky, Ibsen and Bergman are pitch perfect, surreal and absurdly funny. Read full review

About the author (1998)

Allen's favorite personality-the bemused neurotic, the perpetual worrywart, the born loser-dominates his plays, his movies, and his essays. A native New Yorker, Allen attended local schools and despised them, turning early to essay writing as a way to cope with his Since his apprenticeship, writing gags for comedians such as Sid Caesar and Garry Moore, the image he projects-of a "nebbish from Brooklyn"-has developed into a personal metaphor of life as a concentration camp from which no one escapes alive. Allen wants to be funny, but isn't afraid to be serious either-even at the same time. His film Annie Hall, co-written with Marshall Brickman and winner of four Academy Awards, was a subtle, dramatic development of the contemporary fears and insecurities of American life. In her review of Love and Death, Judith Christ wrote that Allen was more interested in the character rather than the cartoon, the situation rather than the set-up, and the underlying madness rather than the surface craziness. Later Allen films, such as Crimes and Misdemeanors or Husbands and Wives, take on a far more somber and philosophic tone, which has delighted some critics and appalled others. In Allen's essays and fiction reprinted from the New Yorker, Getting Even New Yorker, (1971), Without Feathers (1975), and Side Effects (1980), the situations and characters don't just speak to us, they are us.

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