We Mean to be Counted: White Women & Politics in Antebellum Virginia

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 1998 - History - 234 pages
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Over the past two decades, historians have successfully disputed the notion that American women remained wholly outside the realm of politics until the early twentieth century. Still, a consensus has prevailed that, unlike their Northern counterparts, wom
  

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The historical consensus is that white women in the antebellum period were excluded from political participation. Varon argues that elite middle class women were active in political participation, but ... Read full review

Contents

The Representatives of Virtue Female Benelovence and Moral Reform
10
This Most Important Charity The American Colonization Society
41
The Ladies are Whigs Gender and the Second Party System
71
To Still the Angry Passions Women as Sectional Mediators and Partisans
103
Tis Now Liberty or Death THE SECESSION CRISIS
137
EPILOGUE The War and Beyond
169
Notes
179
Index
221
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About the author (1998)

Elizabeth R. Varon is professor of history at Temple University.

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