Whole Earth Discipline

Front Cover
Atlantic Books, Limited, Oct 1, 2010 - Science - 300 pages
16 Reviews
The green movement used to protect the earth from mankind; now they need to protect mankind from the earth. In Whole Earth Discipline, Stewart Brand argues that in order to do this, they urgently need to abandon much conventional environmental wisdom, and embrace new science and engineering. Cities are actually greener than the countryside, he argues, and urbanization should be encouraged; we must invest massively in nuclear energy; and genetic engineering has the potential to stimulate a second 'Green Revolution'. Combining rigorous thinking and blazing advocacy, this is a powerful and persuasive challenge, and a wake-up call to everyone who cares about the future of our Earth.

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Review: Whole Earth Discipline: Why Dense Cities, Nuclear Power, Transgenic Crops, RestoredWildlands, and Geoengineering Are Necessary

User Review  - Sharjeel Aziz - Goodreads

One of my favorite books. You would find a wealth of well researched ideas on environment and our future. Read full review

Review: Whole Earth Discipline: Why Dense Cities, Nuclear Power, Transgenic Crops, RestoredWildlands, and Geoengineering Are Necessary

User Review  - Greg - Goodreads

Strong counterpoint to many environmentalists who assert that solutions to climate change must not involve nuclear power and GMOs. I don't believe that Brand was completely forthcoming about the dangers of GMOs, but he made some good points about their strengths. Read full review

About the author (2010)

Stewart Brand trained originally as an ecologist. His legendary Whole Earth Catalogue won the US National Book Award in 1972. Brand, whose previous books include The Media Lab, How Buildings Learn, and The Clock of the Long Now, is president and cofounder of the Long Now Foundation and co-founder of the Global Business Network. He lives with his wife, Ryan Phelan, on a tugboat in San Francisco Bay.

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