Germany: The Spirit of Her History, Literature, Social Condition and National Economy, Illustrated by Reference to Her Physical, Moral and Political Statistics, and by Comparison with Other Countries (Google eBook)

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C. Jugel, 1839 - Germany - 713 pages
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Page 67 - The object of this confederation is the maintenance of the external and internal safety of Germany, and of the independence and inviolability of the confederated states.
Page 636 - For three weeks prior to his dissolution, the Queen sat by his bedside, performing for him every office which a sick man could require, and depriving herself of all manner of rest and refection. She underwent labours which I thought no ordinary woman could endure. No language can do justice to her meekness, and to the calmness of mind which she sought to keep up before the King while sorrow was preying on her heart. Such constancy of affection, I think, was one of the most interesting spectacles...
Page 601 - no man is allowed to marry till his twenty-fifth year, on account of his military duties, unless permission be especially obtained or purchased : at that age he must also obtain permission, which is granted on proving that he and his wife would have together sufficient to maintain a family or to establish themselves; in large towns, say from 800 to 1000 florins (from 66/.
Page 123 - Alexandrines—the worst form he could possibly have chosen. Fortunately, he hit upon the hexameter, in which his success was signal and complete. The first cantos of the Messiah were published, 1748, in a periodical which issued from the Leipsic press. The effect which it produced upon the public, cannot be measured, even by the greatest possible sensation which a work can now create. In our days, politics usurp all attention, and have almost driven literature from the field. It is only during a...
Page 145 - He was of .1 pliable, plastic, susceptible nature ; at last , perhaps , he verged towards the undecided and indefinite; and even in his best years, we too often miss in him the strength and acuteness of a master-mind. He first gave to German literature that cosmopolitical tendency, which has increased since his time to such a degree, as to have become its peculiar boast. Herder was a poet, but not a philosopher; — rather a literary than a learned man. He had the faculty of happily divining where...
Page 326 - ... and sometimes by the ministerial authorities. Incompetent teachers are sometimes returned to their seminary for additional preparation; and no inefficient teaching nor lax discipline overlooked or permitted in the schools. The directors of schools are expected to be the guides and friends of the teachers. They are bound, says the law, especially to attend to the young masters...
Page 636 - ... attention to the discharge of every public duty to the utmost of his power; his attention to every paper that was brought to him; the serious state of his mind, and his devotion to his religious duties preparatory to his departure for that happy world where he hoped that he had been called. " Three different times," added the prelate, " was I summoned to his presence the day before his dissolution.
Page 154 - ... with youth. Thus, in the last creations of Goethe, the outline is gone, and the figure melts away on all sides into air. Goethe did not shine in a critical capacity ; he prescribed to all artists a strict imitation of the ancients; but this is at once a narrow-minded and discouraging doctrine, for every age, unless it be worthless, must have a character of its own. The genius of the middle ages displayed unrivalled excellence in many departments which were uncultivated by the classics ; and if...
Page 275 - And, if we are to judge from the tone of many popular writings, from the feelings entertained by many towards the clergy, and from the spirit in which religious matters are often handled in society, we must anticipate, however reluctantly, that, not only in Germany, but in some other parts of Europe, the heaviest calamity impending over the whole fabric of society in our time, is the lengthening stride of bold scepticism in some parts, and the more stealthy onwards-creeping step of critical cavil...
Page 323 - Christianity. The daily occupations, therefore, shall begin and end with a short prayer, and some pious reflections; and all the solemnities of the schools shall be interspersed with songs of a religious character. Obedience to the laws, fidelity and attachment to the sovereign and state, are to be carefully inculcated. No kind of punishment which has a tendency to weaken the sentiment of honour shall in any case be inflicted. Incorrigible scholars, after the necessary attempts to reclaim them have...

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