The Description of Ireland: And the State Thereof as it is at this Present in Anno 1598 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Edmund Hogan
M. H. Gill, 1878 - Ireland - 382 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 42 - All the way the people of the country met him with great joy and gladness, and, as their manner is, bestowed many blessings upon him for performing so good a deed and delivering them from their long oppressions.' There is no evidence from the English side about the intelligence upon which Russell had acted, but it is virtually certain that he had been informed where Feagh MacHugh was lying. The Irish annalists declare that...
Page 74 - It seemed incredible that by so barbarous inhabitants the ground should be so manured, the fields so orderly fenced, the towns so frequently inhabited, and the highways and paths so well beaten, as the Lord Deputy here found them.
Page 35 - ... there is of Ireland into Irish and English Pales, for when the Irish had raised continual tumults against the English planted here with the conquest, at last they coursed them into a narrow circuit of certain shires in Leinster, which the English did choose as the fattest soil, most defensible, their proper right, and most open to receive help from England ; hereupon it was termed their Pale, as whereout they durst not peep ; but now, both within this Pale uncivil Irish and some rebels do dwell,...
Page 42 - ... him into our hands, being so hardly followed as that he was run out of breath, and forced to take a cave, where one Milborne, sergeant to Captain Lea, first lighted on him, and the fury of our soldiers was so great as he could not be brought away alive; thereupon the said sergeant cut off Feagh's head with his own sword and presented his head to my Lord, which with his carcass was brought to Dublin, to the great comfort and joy of all that province.
Page 295 - From about the yeare 1555, as is well known, these late heresies by force, never by voluntarie allowance, oppressed religion in our countrie, banished teachers, extinguished learning, exiled to foreign countries all instruction, and enforced our youth, either at home to be ignorant, or abroad in povertie rather to glean eares of learning, than with leisure, to reap any great abundance thereof.
Page 132 - Wee had daily proofe, during our continuance in that citty, how well his schollers profited under him, by verses and orations which they presented us. Wee sent for that schoolemaster before us, and seriously advised him to conform to the Religion established, and not prevailing...
Page 40 - Those that dwell even within the sight of the smoke of Dublin are not subject to the laws. The very gall of Ireland, and the flame from which all others take their lights, is our next neighbour Pheaghe McHugh, who, like one absolute within himself, with his den of thieves, ruleth all things in his own country at his own will, refusing in person to come to the Governor, and spoiling his neighbours, who for fear dare not complain.
Page 336 - Norreys, the President, was surprised, and retired to Cork, bringing down on himself a severe reprimand from the English Government. " You might better have resisted than you did, considering the many defensible houses and castles possessed by the undertakers, who, for aught we can hear, were by no means comforted nor supported by you, but either from lack of comfort from you, or out of mere cowardice, fled away from the rebels on the first alarm.
Page 42 - God to deliver him into our hands, being so hardly followed as that he was run out of breath, and forced to take a cave, where one Milborne, sergeant to Captain Lea, first lighted on him, and the fury of our soldiers was so great as he could not be brought away alive; thereupon the said sergeant cut off...
Page 159 - In choosing their magistrate, they respect not only his riches, but also they weigh his experience : and therefore they elect for their Mayor neither a rich man that is young, nor an old man that is poor. They are cheerful in the entertainment of strangers, hearty one to another, nothing given to factions. They love no idle bench whistlers, nor " luskish faitors " (lazy vagabonds) : for young and old are wholly addicted to thriving, the men commonly to traffic, the women to spinning and carding.

Bibliographic information