The Case for Falling in Love: Why We Can't Master the Madness of Love -- and Why That's the Best Part (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sourcebooks, Inc., Feb 1, 2011 - Family & Relationships - 304 pages
24 Reviews

Praise for The Case for Falling in Love

"Why play 'hard to get' when you can just get what you want? Mari Ruti's lively research, from Plato to Freud to Gossip Girl to her own bedroom, finally puts an end to playing games, and provides a resource for lovers and the love-scorned alike. A must-read for anyone who has ever fallen in love, wants to, or wants to know what went wrong."
-Arianne Cohen, creator of TheSexDiariesProject.com

"At last, a relationship advice book that will actually work. If you're intelligent, interested in love, and like a book you can't put down, this is it. John Gray, move over. The brilliant Mari Ruti has arrived."
-Juliet Schor, professor of sociology, Boston College, and author of Born to Buy and Plenitude: The New Economics of True Wealth

"Groundbreaking...Ruti opens the eyes of her readers so that they can love better...A must-read."
-Nancy Redd, New York Times bestselling author of Body Drama

"Finally, a book that takes love seriously. Written with passion and verve...I wish I had read this book years ago!"
-Sean Carroll, author of From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time

Are you tired of reading book after book and playing game after game, trying to avoid heartbreak? It seems impossible, and maybe that's because you can't lock up your heart like that-not if you want the real thing. And maybe that's one of the best things about love.

We've been thinking about it all wrong. Our culture's insistence that women need to learn how to catch and keep a man is actually doing much more harm than good. The more we try to manipulate our relationships, the less we are truly able to experience love's benefits and wonders.

Love is a slippery, unruly thing, and trying to control and manage it robs us of its delicious unpredictability.

Sure, letting go of the reins a bit might mean a broken heart, but heartbreak, in fact, offers a wealth of possibilities-creativity, wisdom, and growth-that we need in order to make the most of our lives.

Liberating for women who are frustrated by the idea that they just need to learn the right "formula," The Case for Falling in Love shows that there isn't a method to mastering the madness of love. But that might be exactly what's so wonderful about it.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ennie - LibraryThing

Another one I shouldn't have requested from LT, since I'm kind of retired from this venue and didn't really want to read about it. So I skimmed and didn't absorb much. My fault; it could be a wonderful and useful book, for all I know. Read full review

Review: The Case for Falling in Love: Why We Can't Master the Madness of Love -- and Why That's the Best Part

User Review  - Christine Jackson - Goodreads

Interesting take on why outmoded cliches about playing hard to get, the Mars-Venus dichotomy, and other such messages in our culture are not relevant to today's romantic search. Overall, an interesting book. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter 2
7
Chapter 3
21
Chapter 4
37
Chapter 5
49
Chapter 6
59
Chapter 7
71
Chapter 8
81
Chapter 9
93
Chapter 10
107
Chapter 11
119
Chapter 12
135
Index
143
About the Authors
147
Back Cover
149
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Mari Ruti was educated at Brown, Harvard, and the University of Paris. After finishing her Harvard doctorate in 2000, she spent four years as assistant director of the university's program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. She is currently associate professor of critical theory at the University of Toronto English Department, where she teaches contemporary theory, continental philosophy, psychoanalysis, gender studies, and popular culture. Ruti is the author of two academic books: Reinventing the Soul: Posthumanist Theory and Psychic Life and A World of Fragile Things: Psychoanalysis and the Art of Living. She splits her time between Toronto, the East Coast, and Maui.

Bibliographic information