The Molly Maguires and the Detectives (Google eBook)

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G.W. Dillingham, 1905 - Molly Maguires - 552 pages
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Contents

I
13
II
22
III
27
IV
36
V
49
VI
59
VII
66
VIII
73
XXVI
271
XXVII
280
XXVIII
293
XXIX
303
XXX
316
XXXI
327
XXXII
337
XXXIII
346

IX
82
X
92
XI
105
XII
113
XIII
124
XIV
134
XV
145
XVI
156
XVII
168
XVIII
179
XIX
194
XX
207
XXI
221
XXII
231
XXIII
239
XXIV
251
XXV
262
XXXIV
356
XXXV
367
XXXVI
377
XXXVII
391
XXXVIII
402
XXXIX
411
XL
423
XLI
433
XLII
441
XLIII
451
XLIV
462
XLV
471
XLVI
486
XLVII
497
XLVIII
508
XLIX
542
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Page 519 - For time at last sets all things even And if we do but watch the hour, There never yet was human power Which could evade, if unforgiven, The patient search and vigil long Of him who treasures up a wrong.
Page 144 - Lawler read it from the paper, as near as may be, as follows : " ' I, James McKenna, having heard the objects of the order fully explained, do solemnly swear that I will, with the help of God, keep inviolably secret all the acts and things done by this order, and obey the constitution and by-laws in every respect. Should I hear a member illy spoken of, I will espouse his cause, and convey the information to him as soon as possible for me so to do. I will obey my superior officers in everything lawful,...
Page 516 - ... well he had avenged himself upon his assailants. These coal fields for twenty years, I may say, have been the theatre of the commission of crimes such as our very nature revolts at. This very organization that we are now, for the first time, exposing to the light of day, has hung like a pall over the people of this county. Before it fear and terror fled cowering to homes which afforded no sanctuary against the vengeance of their pursuers. Behind it stalked darkness and despair, brooding like...
Page 17 - What we want, and everybody wants, is to get within this apparently impenetrable ring; turn to the light the hidden side of this dark and cruel body, to probe to its core this festering sore upon the body politic, which is rapidly gnawing into the vitals and sapping the life of the community. Crime must be punishable in the mountains of Pennsylvania, as it is in the agricultural counties, and in all well-regulated countries.
Page 143 - We are joined together to promote friendship, unity and true Christian charity among our members, by raising money for the maintenance of the aged, sick, blind, and infirm. The motto of the order is, Friendship, Unity, and true Christian Charity; unity, in uniting for mutual support in sickness and distress ; friendship, in assisting each other to the best of our ability ; true Christian charity by doing to each other and all the world as we would wish they should do unto us." It is the desire to...
Page 143 - I will now proceed," said the presiding officer, in a pompous and affected tone of voice, "to explain to you the objects of the Ancient Order of Hibernians : ' We are joined together to promote friendship, unity and true Christian charity among our members, by raising money for the maintenance of the aged, sick, blind, and infirm. The motto of the order is, Friendship, Unity, and true Christian Charity...
Page 518 - There is not a place on the habitable globe where these men can find refuge and in which they will not be tracked down. Let them go to the Rocky Mountains, or to the shores of the Pacific ; let them traverse the bleak deserts of Siberia, penetrate into the jungles of India, or wander over the wild steppes of Central Asia, and they will be dogged and tracked and brought to justice, just as surely as Thomas Munley is brought to justice to-day.
Page 525 - Is there a man in this audience, looking at me now, and hearing me denounce this association, who longs to point his pistol at me ? I tell him that he has as good a chance here as he will ever have again.
Page 479 - After his defeat at the first battle of Shiloh, nearly every newspaper of both parties in the North, almost every member of Congress, and public sentiment everywhere demanded his removal. Friends of the President pleaded with him to give the command to some one else, for his own sake as well as for the good of the country. Lincoln listened for hours one night, speaking only at rare intervals to tell a pithy story, until the clock struck one. Then, after a long silence, he said : "I can't spare this...
Page 521 - I shall say but little about the Irish except that I am myself the son of an Irishman, proud of my ancestry, and proud of my race, and never ashamed of it except when I see that Ireland has given birth to wretches such as these. These men call themselves Irishmen ! These men parade on St. Patrick's Day and claim to be good Catholics ! Where are the honest Irishmen of this county ? Why do not they rise up and strike down these wretches that usurp the name of Irishmen...

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