The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, with Documents, Narratives Illustrative Incidents, Poetry, Etc, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Frank Moore
Putnam, 1862 - United States
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Contents

John Bosss Proclamation
145
Hudson Biver Baptist Association Report
151
Gov Pierponts Message and accompanying
157
General Buckners Letters to Gov Magoffin
163
of the Army of the West June 23
167
Fight at Carters Creek Va
169
New York31st Regiment S V
170
Col P St George Cookes Response
171
New York23th Regiment S V
172
Col Wallaces Official Report of the Skirmish at Pattersons Creek
174
General Banks Proclamation June 27
176
32d Regiment S V
177
Gen Banks Instructions June 7
178
Plan of the Battle at Great Bethel
179
Official Report of the Action at Matthias Point
180
MarylandLetter of Gov Hicks in reply to Mayor Brown on the Bridge Burning
181
Rebel Official Account of the Battle at New Creek Va
184
Reverdy Johnson on the Power of the Presi dent to suspend the Habeas Corpus writ
185
Lieut Mayos Response to the Proclamation of Gov Letcher
193
Delaicare Meeting at Dover June 27
194
0Oj Gen Schencks Defence
195
Gov Ptttus Proclamation June 23
196
Charles D Drakes Speech at Louisiana Mo
197
Joseph Segars Speech in the Virginia House of Delegates March 30
214
Galusha A Grows Speech July 4
222
Abraham Lincolns Message July 4
223
Report of the Secretary of War July 1
229
9 the Navy July 4
235
63j The Fight at Romney Va
242
Battle at Falling Waters Va July 2 212
246
702 Skirmish at Newport News Va July 5
251
Fight at Middle ForkJlridge Va 231
252
A Flag of Truce from the Rebels 234
254
Tfie Capture of the French Lady 235
255
Debate on the Loan Bill in the House of Repre sentatives July 10 236
256
Daniel S Dickinson Address at Amherst Col lege
259
703 Battle at Monroe Station Mo
270
Col Siegels Report of the Battle of Carthage
271
Henry A Wises Proclamation July 0
273
Reverdy Johnson Remarks in the Supreme Court of the United States
274
Major Sturgis Proclamation July 4
275
McClellans Report
283
Statement of David L Hart
284
Fight at Barboursville Va
285
Col Pegrams Surrender July 12
286
Confederate Army Generals
296
Report of Colonel Davies July 14
303
Gen Pattersons Movement on Bunker Hill Va 803
304
John C Breckinridges Speech in the United States Senate July 16
305
Leonidas Polks General Order July 13
310
Peace Meeting at Nyack N Y July 15
311
The Advance into Virginia
312
N Y Herald
314
97a The Constitution of the Confederate States of America
321
Occupation of Fairfax Court House Va
327
A Civilians Account
329
Battle of Scarytown Va
330
Cincinnati Gazette Narrative
331
Gen McDowells Order in reference to Depre dations
332
Battle of Bull Bun Va
366
llln The Dark Day By Edward Everett
388
Beauregards Forage Order
394
Gen Rosecrans Order No 1
401
Gov Morgans Proclamation July 25
407
Bishop Oteys Pastoral Letter July 26
413
To Jefferson Davis 44
414
Coxs Peace Proposition
435
Col Miles Defence
441
to Suppress Insurrection August 1
460
General D M Frosts Letter to Claiborne
494
Resolutions of the Convention of Western Vir
522
Abraham Lincolns Proclamation forbidding
532
Not Yet William Cullen Bryant 1
1
A Battle Hymn James Mackey 11
11
Guard 83
33
Let Us Alone W H Burleigh 47
47
The Soldiers Last Word Park Benjamin 48
48
The StarSpangled Banner London Punch 49
49
Hear us Father Save our Land E T P Beach 50
50
To the United States Mayne Reid 51
51
The Men who Fell in Baltimore J W Forney 52
52
The Dream and the Awakening 53
53
A Song for the Illinois Volunteers Agnes 54
54
Russells Flight by B 63
60
Kentucky Forsythe Willson 1
61
The Invisible Armies 62
62
They Call Me a Traitor Now 62
63
The Volunteers Wife G A Townsend 64
64
Upon the Hill before Centreville Geo II
65
Wars Changes B P Shillaber 67
67
Our Southern Land 63
68
Jeff Davis is Coming O 0 70
70
The Flag Divided 71
71
Song sung in Richmond 73
73
Lettuce Alone 74
74
A Vision in the Forum T Buchanan Bead
76
A Gathering Song 77
77
A Psalm of Freedom Bev E II Sears 73
78
The American Marseillaise 21 R Bradbury 73
79
Ho Sons of the Puritan 80
80
Compromise Edna Dean Proctor 81
81
War Sonnet C K Tuckerman 83
83
The Union E L ilantcr 89
89
Yankee Doodle on the Crisis 93
93
Southward Ho 94
94
The Cavaliers Song Vanity Fair 95
95
What of the Night? 98
96
Weep oer the Heroes as they Fall Chas Wm Butler 97
97
General McClellans Address to his Soldiers July 19 354
103
The London Times on American Affairs 104
104
Manassas Florence Willesford Borron 105
105
The Battle Summer H T Tuckerman 106
106
My Maryland words altered J F Wie shampel Jr 107
107
Nineteen Hundred 108
108
To General Butler by Bay State 109
109
God Preserve the Union John Savage 110
110
Thoughts suggested by the occasion on the night of July 41861 by V C B
111
Oh Say not it is borne to Earth Ed G Jones 124 The Two Furrows C II Webb 112
112

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Page 129 - To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased, by the consent of the legislature of the State in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful 'buildings.
Page 324 - Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on the Journal.
Page 140 - No political dreamer was ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the States, and of compounding the American people into one common mass.
Page 185 - Texas by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings or by the powers vested in the marshals by law...
Page 140 - Resolved, That the preceding Constitution be laid before the United States in Congress assembled, and that it is the opinion of this Convention, that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention of Delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, under the recommendation of its Legislature, for their assent and ratification...
Page 325 - The importation of negroes of the African race from any foreign country other than the slaveholding States or Territories of the United States of America, is hereby forbidden; and Congress is required to pass such laws as shall effectually prevent the same.
Page 226 - To state the question more directly, are all the laws but one to go unexecuted, and the government itself go to pieces lest that one be violated? Even in such a case, would not the official oath be broken if the government should be overthrown, when it was believed that disregarding the single law would tend to preserve it?
Page 227 - What is now combated is the position that secession is consistent with the Constitution is lawful and peaceful. It is not contended that there is any express law for it; and nothing should ever be implied as law which leads to unjust or absurd consequences. The nation purchased with money the countries out of which several of these States were formed. Is it just that they shall go off without leave and without refunding? The nation paid very large sums (in the aggregate, I believe, nearly a hundred...
Page 140 - The assent of the States, in their sovereign capacity, is implied in calling a convention, and thus submitting that instrument to the people. But the people were at perfect liberty to accept or reject it; and their act was final. It required not the affirmance, and could not be negatived, by the State governments. The constitution, when thus adopted, was of complete obligation, and bound the State sovereignties.
Page 140 - The government of the Union, then, (whatever may be the influence of this fact on the case,) is, emphatically and truly, a government of the people. In form and in substance it emanates from them. Its powers are granted by them, and are to be exercised directly on them, and for their benefit.

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