Highland Sanctuary: Environmental History in Tanzania's Usambara Mountains

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Ohio University Press, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 215 pages
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FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY, THE WORLD has recognized the extraordinary biological diversity of the forests of Tanzania's Usambara Mountains. As international attention has focused on forest conservation, farmers, foresters, biologists, and the Tanzanian state have realized that only complex negotiations will save these treasured, but rapidly disappearing, landscapes. Highland Sanctuary unravels the complex interactions among agriculture, herding, forestry, the colonial state, and the landscape itself. In his examination of the region's history of ecological transformation, Christopher Conte demonstrates how these forces have combined to create an ever-changing mosaic of forest and field. His study illuminates the debate over conservation, arguing that contingency and chance, the stuff of human history, have shaped forests in ways that rival the power of nature. In Highland Sanctuary, the forest becomes part of human history, rather than something outside of it. Highland Sanctuary cuts through a legacy of contention and ill will to inform contemporary conservation initiatives. Professor Conte explains how ecological changes take divergent paths in similar environments, in this case on mountains that harbor unique flora and fauna, and how these mountain environments achieve international importance as centers of biodiversity.
  

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Contents

1 Forming the Highland Sanctuary
1
2 Humanitys Imprint
17
3 Colonial Science and Agricultural Development at Kwai and Amani
41
4 Seeking the Good Forest
68
5 Transforming the Agricultural Landscape
96
6 Agriculture and the State
126
7 Preserving the Usambaras in Independent Tanzania
148
Notes
161
Bibliography
201
Index
211
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About the author (2004)

Conte is an associate professor of history at Utah State University in Logan, where he teaches African and environmental history.

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