The Autobiography of Ben Franklin (Google eBook)

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NuVision Publications, LLC, Jan 1, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 196 pages
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Benjamin Franklin was born the youngest of seventeen children. Born a native of Boston on January 6th 1706. Franklin grew up and found work as a printer in 1723 and eventually started his own printing house where he began printing "The Pennsylvania Gazette" among this he partially wrote and published "Poor Richard Almanac" and later founded the "American Philosophical Society". In 1777 in while living in Philadelphia Franklin was chosen as a member of the Continental Congress.Also known for his inventions Franklin died on April 17th of 1770.Please Note: This book is easy to read in true text, not scanned images that can sometimes be difficult to decipher. The Microsoft eBook has a contents page linked to the chapter headings for easy navigation. The Adobe eBook has bookmarks at chapter headings and is printable up to two full copies per year.
  

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Contents

CHAPTER I
              CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
Chapter VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII 
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

One of 17 children, Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston on January 17, 1706. He ended his formal education at the age of 10 and began working as an apprentice at a newspaper. Running away to Philadelphia at 17, he worked for a printer, later opening his own print shop. Franklin was a man of many talents and interests. As a writer, he published a colonial newspaper and the well-known Poor Richard's Almanack, which contains his famous maxims. He authored many political and economic works, such as The Way To Wealth and Journal of the Negotiations for Peace. He is responsible for many inventions, including the Franklin stove and bifocal eyeglasses. He conducted scientific experiments, proving in one of his most famous ones that lightning and electricity were the same. As a politically active citizen, he helped draft the Declaration of Independence and lobbied for the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. He also served as ambassador to France. He died in April of 1790 at the age of 84.

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