The Arts, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Hamilton Easter Field, Forbes Watson
Hamilton Easter Field, 1920 - Art
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Page 1 - DRAMA, and that the following is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, management (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above caption, required by the Act...
Page 57 - It must in the first place be adapted to that disinterested intensity of contemplation, which we have found to be the effect of cutting off the responsive action. It must be suited to that heightened power of perception which we found to result therefrom.
Page 24 - This soil is propitious to every seed, and tares must needs grow in it. But why should it not also breed clear thinking, honest judgment, and rational happiness? These things are indeed not necessary to existence, and without them America might long remain rich and populous, like many a barbarous land in the past. But in that case its existence will be hounded, like theirs, by falsity and remorse. May Heaven avert the omen, and make the new world a better world than the old.
Page 58 - It is only the novice in political economy who thinks it the duty of government to make its citizens happy. Government has no such office. To protect the weak and the minority from the impositions of the strong and the majority, to prevent any one from positively working to render the people unhappy (if we may so express it), to do the labor not of an officious intermeddler in the affairs of men but of a prudent watchman who prevents outrage these are rather the proper duties of a government....
Page 58 - How, then, can any man with a heart in his breast, begrudge the coming of Europe's ( needy ones, to the plentiful storehouse of \ the New World?
Page 43 - I have just been skimming through an illustrated book called 'Noa Noa,' by a Frenchman, Paul Gaugin, which describes or pretends to describe a visit to Tahiti. There is not much fault to be found with it as a narrative, but the pictures of the natives are atrocious. Many of the figures are distorted, and all of them have a smutty look, as if they had been rubbed with lampblack or coal dust. There is not one simple, honest presentation of the natural human form in it. When the Parisian becomes a degenerate,...
Page 24 - These things are indeed not necessary to existence, and without them America might long remain rich and populous like many a barbarous land in the past ; but in that case its existence would be hounded, like theirs, by falsity and remorse. May Heaven avert the omen, and make the new world a better world than the old ! In the classical and romantic tradition of Europe, love, of which there was very little, was supposed to be kindled by beauty, of which there was a great deal : perhaps moral chemistry...
Page 62 - As to the value of the aesthetic emotion it is clearly infinitely removed from those ethical values to which Tolstoy would have confined it. It seems to be as remote from actual life and its practical utilities as the most useless mathematical theory. One can only say that those who experience it feel it to have a peculiar quality of " reality " which makes it a matter of infinite importance in their lives.
Page 55 - The nervous mechanism which results in flight causes a certain state of consciousness, which we call the emotion of fear. The whole of animal life, and a great part of human life, is made up of these instinctive reactions to sensible objects, and their accompanying emotions. But man has the peculiar faculty of calling up again in his mind the echo of past experiences of this kind, of going over it again, " in imagination " as we say. He has, therefore, the possibility of a double life ; one the actual...
Page 55 - That the graphic arts are the expression of the imaginative life rather than a copy of actual life might be guessed from observing children. Children, if left to themselves, never, I believe, copy what they see, never, as we say, " draw from nature," but express, with a delightful freedom and sincerity, the mental images which make up their own imaginative lives.

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