Perspectives on Western Art, Volume 2: Source Documents and Readings from the Renaissance to the 1970s

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Linnea H. Wren
Westview Press, 1993 - Art - 468 pages
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This anthology of readings related to Western art history explains specific works of art illustrated in Janson's History of Art and De la Croix and Tansey's Gardner's Art Through the Ages in terms of the ideas, beliefs, and concerns of the people and cultures who created the art. It brings a new understanding of art because it shows the social and cultural basis of major works of art through history. The ten sections are Ancient Near East; Egyptian; Aegean; Greek; Etruscan; Roman; early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic; early Medieval; Romanesque; and Gothic. The readings have been drawn from many areas of intellectual and social history, including religion, philosophy, literature, science, economics, and law. Each selection is preceded by an introductory note, which discusses the readings in terms of its subject and theme, its source and usage, and its relevance to the study of the work of art.
  

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Contents

NineteenthCentury
223
Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes The Third of May
225
Joseph Mallord William Turner The Slave Ship 1840
233
Eugene Delacroix The Massacre of Chios 182224
239
Gustave Courbet Burial at Ornans 1849
248
PierreAuguste Renoir Le Moulin de la Galette 1876
257
Paul Gauguin The Vision After the Sermon 1888
265
Mary Cassatt The Bath 189192
276

Parmigianino Madonna with the Long Neck c 1535
63
Titian Sacred and Profane Love c 1515
70
Paolo Veronese Christ in the House of Levi 1573
78
Hugo van der Goes The Portinari Altarpiece c 1476
90
Hieronymus Bosch The Garden of Earthly Delights
97
Albrecht Durer Adam and Eve The Fall of Man 1504
100
Matthias Grunewald Crucifixion from The henheim
106
Germain Pilon Descent from the Cross 1583
115
Baroque Art in Italy France and England
121
Gianlorenzo Bernini The Ecstasy of Saint Theresa 164552
124
I Went Out Fuh of Consolation 1560
131
Inigo Jones Banqueting House at Whitehall London
139
Baroqu Art to the Netherlands and Spain
152
Rembrandt van Rijn SelfPortrait c 1659
162
Jacob van Ruisdael View of Haarlem from the Dunes
170
EighteenthCentury
177
Balthasar Neumann Vierzehnheiligen near Bamberg
185
JeanHonore Fragonard The Swing 1766
193
Thomas Gainsborough Robert Andrews and His Wife
200
Certain
206
John Henry Fuseli The Nightmare 1781
214
Edvard Munch The Scream c 1895
286
Gustav Klirat Death and Life 1908 and 1911
292
Pablo Picasso Still Life with Chair Caning 191112
298
Umberto Boccioni Unique Forms of Continuity in Space
304
Ernst Barlach War Monument Giistrow Cathedral 1927
311
Vladimir Tatlin Model for the Monument to the Third
319
Paul Klee Twittering Machine 1922
326
Kurt Schwitters Merz 19 1920
335
Dorothea Laoge Migrant Mother California 1936
339
Max Beckmann Departure 193235
346
Arshile Gorky The Liver Is the Cocks Comb 1944
354
Later TwentiethCentury
362
Wallace Harrison and the International Advisory Committee
368
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe Lake Shore Drive Apartment
375
Edward Kienholz The Wait 196465
383
Bamett Newman Broken Obelisk 196367
389
Helen Frankenthaler Blue Causeway 1963
396
Jasper Johns Target with Four Faces 1955
405
Robert Smithson Spiral Jetty 1970
413
Index
423
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About the author (1993)

Linnea H. Wren is assistant professor of art at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota, and is the editor of Perspectives on Western Art (Volume 2): Source Documents and Readings from the Renaissance to the 1970s (1994).

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