Democracy and social ethics (Google eBook)

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Macmillan Co., 1902 - Democracy - 281 pages
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User Review  - Allison C. McCulloch - Goodreads

I've learned that it's hard for people to accept that a woman's place is anywhere other than the home. Read full review

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Page 220 - We have learned to say that the good must be extended to all of society before it can be held secure by any one person or any one class; but we have not yet learned to add to that statement, that unless all men and all classes contribute to a good, we cannot even be sure that it is worth having.
Page 191 - Teach the children to write legibly, and to figure accurately and quickly; to acquire habits of punctuality and order; to be prompt to obey, and not question why; and you will fit them to make their way in the world as I have made mine.
Page ii - DEMOCRACY AND SOCIAL ETHICS. By JANE ADDAMS. COLONIAL GOVERNMENT. By PAUL S. REINSCH, PH.D., LL.B. AMERICAN MUNICIPAL PROGRESS. By CHARLES ZUEBLIN.
Page 152 - What he does attain, however, is not the result of his individual striving, as a solitary mountain climber beyond the sight of the valley multitude, but it is underpinned and upheld by the sentiments and aspirations of many others. Progress has been slower perpendicularly, but incomparably greater because lateral.
Page 6 - We are learning that a standard of social ethics is not attained by travelling a sequestered byway, but by mixing on the thronged and common road where all must turn out for one another, and at least see the size of one another's burdens.
Page 151 - ... fellow-men. The president of the Pullman company thought out within his own mind a beautiful town. He had power with which to build this town, but he did not appeal to nor obtain the consent of the men who were living in it. The most unambitious reform, recognizing the necessity for this consent, makes for slow but sane and strenuous progress, while the most ambitious of social plans and experiments, ignoring this, is prone to the failure of the model town of Pullman.
Page ii - Half leather. $1.25 net each. MONOPOLIES AND TRUSTS. By RICHARD T. ELY, PH.D., LL.D. THE ECONOMICS OF DISTRIBUTION. By JOHN A. HOBSON.
Page 180 - The educators should certainly conserve the learning and training necessary for the successful individual and family life, but should add to that a preparation for the enlarged social efforts which our increasing democracy requires. The democratic ideal demands of the school that it shall give the child's own experience a social value ; that it shall teach him to direct his own activities and adjust . them to those of other people.
Page 30 - ... needed? The visitor says, sometimes, that in holding her poor family so hard to a standard of thrift she is really breaking down a rule of higher living which they formerly possessed; that saving, which seems quite commendable in a comfortable part of town, appears almost criminal in a poorer quarter where the next-door neighbor needs food, even if the children of the family do not.
Page 26 - ... conscious duty. But at bottom we distrust a little a scheme which substitutes a theory of social conduct for the natural promptings of the heart, even although we appreciate the complexity of the situation. The poor man who has fallen into distress, when he first asks aid, instinctively expects tenderness, consideration, and forgiveness. If it is the first time, it has taken him long to make up his mind to take the step. He comes somewhat bruised and battered, and instead of being met with warmth...

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