The go-between

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New York Review Books, Mar 31, 2002 - Fiction - 326 pages
19 Reviews
"The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there." Summering with a fellow schoolboy on a great English estate, Leo, the hero of L. P. Hartley's finest novel, encounters a world of unimagined luxury. But when his friend's beautiful older sister enlists him as the unwitting messenger in her illicit love affair, the aftershocks will be felt for years. The inspiration for the brilliant Joseph Losey/Harold Pinter film starring Julie Christie and Alan Bates, The Go-Between is a masterpiecea richly layered, spellbinding story about past and present, naivete and knowledge, and the mysteries of the human heart. This volume includes, for the first time ever in North America, Hartley's own introduction to the novel.

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Review: The Go-Between

User Review  - Jeanette - Goodreads

The first line of this book brought familiarity, but reading further I realized that I had positively read this book before. Possibly in my late 20's, and no earlier than that, I am sure. And what ... Read full review

Review: The Go-Between

User Review  - Howard - Goodreads

This English modern classic was written in 1953 by Hartley who was born in 1895. He would thus have been a 6 year old at the time of the story's setting at the turn of the century in 1900. I mention ... Read full review

Contents

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Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Novelist, short-story writer, and literary critic, L. P. Hartley won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 1947 for Eustace and Hilda. Part of a trilogy that offers a penetrating and disturbing psychological study of what Hartley called "sisteritis" in an upper-middle-class family, the three books were described by the London Times as "unique in modern writing...diverting and disturbing. Beneath a surface "almost overcivilized' the reviewer found "a hollow of horror."' One of Hartley's special interests is Henry James, with whom he has been compared. In The Tragic Comedians, James Hall devotes a chapter to Hartley, who is respected but not popular in Britain, read by few in America, but praised by discerning critics in both countries: "Along with Green and Powell, Hartley has changed the direction of the comic novel, raising even more seriously than they the question of whether it remains comic at all.... His freshness consists at first in simply changing the patterns of the naturalist novel from social insights to emotional ones; yet in doing so he departs from both the older solid way of conceiving character and the more recent fluid way of conceiving consciousness." David Cecil called The Go-Between (1953) "impressive," and wrote: "Hartley is for me the first of living novelists in certain important respects; beauty of style, lyrical quality of feeling and, above all, the power and originality of his imagination, which wonderfully mingles ironic comedy, whimsical fancy and a mysterious Hawthorne-like poetry." The Novelist's Responsibility is a collection of essays and letters.

The Irish author Colm Toibin s most recent novel, the bestseThe Irish author Colm Toibin s most recent novel, the bestseThe Irish author Colm Toibin s most recent novel, the bestselling "Brooklyn", won the 2010 Costa Fiction Award. lling "Brooklyn", won the 2010 Costa Fiction Award. lling "Brooklyn", won the 2010 Costa Fiction Award.