First Lessons in Zoology (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1903 - Zoology - 363 pages
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Page 81 - ... Much increase in size and activity make certain demands on the surface of the body which unfit it for respiraton. The hard covering of insects, crabs, and other animals necessary in connection with locomotion and for protection from injuries illustrates this. Again, while in a minute form like Amoeba, the slight increase of surface attained by its protruded processes answers the increased respiratory needs, the surface of a large animal would fall far short of doing so, because, according to...
Page 368 - The author evidently planned at the outset to take every attractive feature of plants of all grades, and place these attractive features in the very best light. For this purpose he has skillfully employed a brilliant style of exposition, and he has not hesitated to use illustrations in black and in color with the freest hand. The purpose has been attained. He has succeeded in constructing a popular work on the phenomena of vegetation which is practically without any rival. The German edition has...
Page 108 - They consist each of a small sac filled with liquid, in which are suspended several grains of sand or other hard bodies. The inner surface of the sac is lined with fine auditory hairs. The sound-waves coming through the air or water outside strike against this sac, which lies in a hollow on the upper or outer side of the antennae. The sound-waves are taken up by the contents of the sac and stimulate the fine hairs, which in turn give this stimulus to the nerves which run from them to the principal...
Page 184 - Bembex, a number of individuals build close together, forming a colony. The nests may be made of mud and attached, for shelter, under leaves, rocks, or eaves of buildings, or may be burrows hollowed out in the ground, in trees or in the stems of plants. The adult wasp lives upon fruit or nectar but the young grub or larva must have animal food, and here the parent wasp shows a rigid conservatism, each species providing the sort of food that has been approved by its family for generations, one taking...
Page 185 - When the egg-laying time arrives the female secures her prey, which she either kills or paralyzes, places it in the nest, lays the egg upon it, and then, in most cases, closes the hole and takes no further interest in it, going on to make new nests from day to day. In some genera the female maintains a longer connection with her offspring, not bringing all the...
Page 216 - ... toads have done before, it pushes boldly out over the land and away from the water. If one visits the natural pond at about this season (last half of June, first of July) , he is likely to see many of the little fellows hopping away from the water. And so vigorously do they hop along that in a few days they may be as far as a mile from the pond where they were hatched. After a warm shower they are particularly active, and are then most commonly seen. Many think they rained down. " They were not...
Page 370 - Acquired Reactions ; What the Native Reactions Are ; The Laws of Habit ; The Association of Ideas ; Interest ; Attention ; Memory ; The Acquisition of Ideas ; Apperception ; The Will ; The Gospel of Relaxation ; On a Certain Blindness in Human Beings ; What Makes Life Significant.
Page 299 - ... and elevating her long ovipositor in a loop over her back, with its tip on the bark of the tree, she makes a derrick out of her body and proceeds with great skill and precision to drill a hole (fig.
Page 367 - Illustrated Flora, prepared by Prof. Britton in co-operation with Judge Addison Brown. The text has been revised and brought up to date, and much of novelty has been added. All illustrations are omitted, but specific reference has been made to all of the 4,162 figures in the Illustrated Flora. " It is the most complete and reliable work that ever appeared in the form of ft flora of this region...
Page 366 - We believe it will be received cordially by all lovers of poetry, whether elementary students or not. Basing his selections on the individual excellence and historic importance of the poems, the editor has not allowed his fidelity to the latter test to overrule his taste, and there is very little matter in the book which is historically significant alone. First and last, this is an antho'ogy of the best poetry.

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