A German Grammar for Schools and Colleges: Based on the Public School German Grammar of A.L. Meissner (Google eBook)

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D.C. Heath & Company, 1904 - German language - 436 pages
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Page 1 - A, a; B, b; C, c ; D, d; E, e ; F, f; G, g; H, h; I, i; J, j; K, k ; L, 1; M, m ; N, n...
Page 82 - Pronouns in Address. 186. The German usage herein differs widely from our own. In English the usual form is you, etc., for singular or plural persons ; thou, etc., is restricted to the language of poetry or of devotion (except among the Friends), though it was formerly more widely used. In German, besides these uses, bu, etc., is used also in familiar address ; as, to members of the family, to most intimate friends, to children, to animals, etc. ; sometimes also to express contempt (as formerly in...
Page 105 - Certain strong verbs undergo modification or change of the root-vowel in the second and third persons singular of the present indicative and in the imperative singular.
Page 150 - The shepherd seated himself beside (ace.') the shepherdess. 13. Between him and my brother [there] is no friendship. 14. The child has (is) come without its mother. 15. He has not understood what you say. 16. After we had reached the shore by means of a boat, we went to an inn in order to dry our clothes. 17. He has forgotten to inform you. 18. We shall do nothing contrary to this prohibition. 19. I shall come instead of my brother. 20. The ladies have gone for a walk on the other side of the river...
Page 144 - NOTE 2. — It will be seen that here again, for want of a specific passive auxiliary, there is a possible ambiguity in English which cannot occur in German. (See § 268, note.) Sometimes, however, apparent ambiguity may occur by the idiomatic omission of...
Page 171 - Is your brother at present (je^t) in Basle ? 18. No sir, at present he is in Strassburg. LESSON XXXV. Conjunctions. 324. Conjunctions which connect sentences of like kind are called co-ordinating conjunctions. Conjunctions which introduce dependent clauses are called subordinating conjunctions. Conjunctions are important chiefly from their influence on the order of words. (See Lesson XXXVI.) 325. Co-ordinating conjunctions are either pure conjunctions (the simple connectives) or adverbial conjunctions....
Page 45 - Slnttoort beg gelb(;erm in betn §erren^>aufe tear fe^r gut. i. The hospitals of this town are near (an, dat.) the citywall. 2. The kings of Prussia are rectors of the universities [of] Bonn and Berlin. 3. Here are the materials for (ju, dat.) a dictionary of the gospels. 4. The professors and the doctors have been in the orchard of the pastor. 5. In the museum of the bishop are fossils. 6. The dancing-master is in the nursery with the sons of the general and with the daughters of the professor....
Page 220 - Germany, called $tott»®eutjd) — but all are included in the general term Germanic, or Teutonic. 405. There were thus already considerable diversities of speech between the High-German and the earliest English, as will be more fully shown below (§ 407, etc.). These diversities have been still further increased by historical causes subsequently (§ 414, etc.), so that the kinship of English to German is not always so obvious as its relation to other languages (as French or Latin). Still, this...
Page 198 - Please (33ttte) shut the door and open the windows. 23. This writer has translated the greatest part of Schiller's works. 24. He undressed himself hastily, sprang into the water, and drew the sinking boy out LESSON XL. Derivation of Nouns. NOUNS DERIVED FROM VERBS. — i. WITHOUT SUFFIX. 382. Some nouns are simply the stems of verbs — usually of strong verbs- — sometimes an earlier form of such stems. Such nouns are nearly all masculine : — • ber gall (fallen), the fall.
Page 220 - There (e§) was once a king, whose first-born son lay dangerously ill. LESSON XLV. Relation of German and English. — Summary. In every department of the grammar thus far — even without suggestion from the text or the teacher — the student must have observed the close resemblance between German and English. A brief summary of this subject will now be made. 403. This resemblance is, of course, not accidental, but rests upon historical kinship. The Angles and the Saxons, who conquered Britain...

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