Afghanistan

Front Cover
Media Action International, 2004 - History - 544 pages
1 Review
Updated to reflect recent events, this guidebook provides a unique and indispensable tool for anyone working and traveling in Afghanistan. Specially commissioned articles from leading experts in the field examine Afghanistan’s historical legacy and contemporary milieu, covering everything from the security situation and the resurgence of the Taliban to two decades of human rights abuses and the current situation of women. Street maps for all major cities, practical advice on daily survival, important contacts, and a list of key phrases make this an essential practical resource for any visitor to Afghanistan. Detailed information and statistics on key political and humanitarian sectors are included.

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Review: Afghanistan: Essential Field Guide to Humanitarian and Conflict Zones

User Review  - Paco - Goodreads

Probably the best overview and introduction to Afghanistan and most of its issues. A few of the things are getting a little out of date of course, but this is a good guide both for people interested and people working here. Might be 5 stars except that it is too dern expensive. Read full review

Contents

Preface
6
INFOBRIEFS
132
Aid in the 1980s
150
Culture
169
Disability
186
Economics
199
TRAVEL
282
Central RegionKabul
295
Maps
412
Security tips
428
Traditions customs
446
Weather
459
United Nations agencies
483
Red Cross Red Crescent 488
488
Media organizations
495
Human rights groups
501

Northern RegionMazareSharif
315
Eastern RegionJalalabad
330
Western RegionHerat
350
HazarajatBamiyan
365
Peshawar
383
Health tips
396
Getting the news
507
Libraries
513
EnglishDari phrasebook
525
EnglishPashto field vocabulary
532
Maps
540
Copyright

About the author (2004)

Edward Girardet has written and edited several books, including Afghanistan: The Soviet War. As a foreign correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor and US News and World Report, he first began covering Afghanistan several months prior to the Soviet invasion in 1979. He is currently the editor of Crosslines. Jonathan Walter is the editor of the World Disasters Report, published by the international Red Cross and author of The End of Development. He served for five years as an officer in the British Army's Brigade of Gurkhas. Charles Norchi is a fellow at Yale University's International Security Studies program, is a director of the Policy Sciences Center, Inc., and has served as executive director of the International League for Human Rights and the Afghanistan War Crimes Project. He has published articles on international affairs in several books and publications, including The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The International Herald Tribune, Crosslines, The Yale Journal of World Affairs, and The Harvard Law Review. Mirwais Masood began his career teaching English for Afghan refugees in Islamabad, Pakistan, in 1996. Originally from Kabul, he has reported for the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR) and researched for National Geographic.

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