A Short History of Indians in Canada: Stories

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HarperCollins, Jan 1, 2005 - Indians of North America - 232 pages
11 Reviews
"A flock of Indians has just flown smack into the side of a Bay Street skyscraper. Again. It's up to Bill and Rudy to tag the live ones, nurse them to health at the shelter and release them back into the wild. Thomas King is back in fabulous, fantastical form in this latest collection of short stories, some new, some previously published. Compiled in acomic tour de force, all of the selections in A Short History of Indians in Canada are showcases for King's wholly original brand of imagination and wit. In 20 tales, King pokes a sharp stick into the gears of the native myth-making machine, slyly exposing the raw underbelly of both historical and contemporary native-white relationships. Through the laughter, these stories shimmer brightly with the universal truths that unite us."--Amazon.ca Book Desc.

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Review: A Short History of Indians in Canada: Stories

User Review  - Snehil - Goodreads

Now this is my kind of fictional story book. Each story is beautifully written and gives you something to think about. The book is funny, intelligent, gutsy and honest. I guess I will be reading more fictions esp by Thomas King. Read full review

Review: A Short History of Indians in Canada: Stories

User Review  - Pickyreaderinblack - Goodreads

These short stories of Mr. King's are, so far, darkly hilarious. I keep yelping with laughter as I read. Especially "Tidings of Comfort and Joy", which illustrates Indigenous peoples as "collectibles ... Read full review

Contents

A Short History of Indians in Canada
1
Tidings of Comfort and
5
The Dog I Wish I Had I Would Call It Helen
20
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Thomas King was born in 1943 in Sacramento, California to a Cherokee father and a mother of Greek and German descent. He attended the University of Utah where he received a Ph. D. in Literature. His works focus mainly on Native American way of life. His first novel, Medicine River was made into a television movie. His second novel, Green Grass, Running Water won him the Canadian Authors Award for Fiction and it was shortlisted for the Governor General's Award in 1993. In 2003, he received the National Aboriginal Achievement Award. His most recent title DreadfulWater Shows Up, is written under the pseudonym Hartley Goodweather. He resides in Canada and is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Guelph.

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