Esoteric Christianity, Or the Lesser Mysteries

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Echo Library, 2009 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 144 pages
2 Reviews
Annie Wood Besant (1847-1933) was a prominent Theosophist, women's rights activist, writer and orator and supporter of Irish and Indian self rule. For a time she undertook part-time study at the Birkbeck Literary and Scientific Institution, where her religious and political activities were to cause alarm. She was earning a small weekly wage by writing a column for the National Reformer, the newspaper of the National Secular Society. For many years Annie was a friend of the Society's leader, Charles Bradlaugh. Both of them became household names in 1877 when they published a book by the American birthcontrol campaigner Charles Knowlton. After joining the Marxists, Annie stood for election to the London School Board. In 1889, she was asked to write a review for the Pall Mall Gazette on The Secret Doctrine, a book by H. P. Blavatsky. After reading it, she sought an interview with its author and in this way she was converted to Theosophy. Her works include: The Political Status of Women (1874), The Law of Population (1877), Autobiographical Sketches (1885), Reincarnation (1892), Seven Principles of Man (1892), Death - And After? (1893), Karma (1895) and Esoteric Christianity; or, The Lesser Mysteries (1901/05).

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Review: Esoteric Christianity

User Review  - Nalora - Goodreads

For those studying the more esoteric and mystical traditions of Christianity this is a good place to start. Easy to read, thought provoking and leads one off into many other directions worthy of traveling on any spiritual path. Read full review

Review: Esoteric Christianity

User Review  - Glenn Horne - Goodreads

Okay... except for the heavy quoting in parts Read full review

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