Mencken Chrestomathy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Random House LLC, Mar 7, 2012 - Literary Collections - 656 pages
36 Reviews
Edited and annotated by H.L.M., this is a selection from his out-of-print writings. They come mostly from booksóthe six of the PREJUDICES series, A BOOK OF BURLESQUES, IN DEFENSE OF WOMEN, NOTES ON DEMOCRACY, MAKING A PRESIDENT, A BOOK OF CALUMNY, TREATISE ON RIGHT AND WRONGóbut there are also magazine and newspaper pieces that never got between covers (from the American Mercury, the Smart Set, and the Baltimore Evening Sun) and some notes that were never previously published at all.
Readers will find edification and amusement in his estimates of a variety of AmericansóWoodrow Wilson, Aimee Semple McPherson, Roosevelt I and Roosevelt II, James Gibbons Huneker, Rudolph Valentino, Calvin Coolidge, Ring Lardner, Theodore Dreiser, and Walt Whitman. Those musically inclined will enjoy his pieces on Beethoven, Schubert, and Wagner, and there is material for a hundred controversies in his selections on Joseph Conrad, Thorstein Veblen, Nietzsche, and Madame Blavatsky.
  

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A remarkable writer and thinker. - Goodreads
His writing on boxing reeks of sweat and sawdust. - Goodreads
This is his own selection of his best. - Goodreads
He's an excellent writer. - Goodreads
Pithy writing and Misanthropy at its best. - Goodreads
That is the mark of a good writer to me. - Goodreads

Review: A Mencken Chrestomathy

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

Wonderful writing style and insight into the time period of Mencken's youth. Particularly fascinating to read while I was living in Baltimore. Read full review

Review: A Mencken Chrestomathy

User Review  - Jim Morris - Goodreads

This is not a book to sit down and read straight through. It's a book to savor a piece or two before bed, or in an idle moment. Mencken is a great and idiosyncratic stylist, and really fun to read. I ... Read full review

Contents

The Mind of the Slave
319
The Art Eternal
325
The Eternal Conundrum
333
The Boons of Civilization
339
Chiropractic
346
The Foundations of Quackery
353
The Husbandman
360
The Human Body
368

The Lady of
54
Cavia Cobaya
60
Apologia
66
The Restoration of Beauty
73
Immune
80
The Immortality of the Soul
86
The Powers of the
92
Free Will Again
108
The Criminal Law 1 1
118
Cops and Their Ways
126
Under the Elms
132
Clarion Call to Poets 1 39
139
Government
145
Governmental Theories 1 52
152
The Democratic Citizen
159
Last Words
166
American Culture
178
The Sahara of the Bozart PAGE
184
The Confederate Mind
195
History
201
New England
207
The Greeks
213
Undying Glories
219
A Good Man in a Bad Trade
226
W I B
243
Coolidge
251
American Immortals
258
Professor Veblen
265
John D
276
An American Bonaparte
285
To Him That Hath PAGE
293
Personal Note
300
Travail
307
The Boon of Culture
313
Comfort for the Ailing PAGE
374
A Chance for Millionaires
380
Portrait of an Ideal World
388
Dempsey vs Carpentier
399
Lodge
408
The End of Prohibition
416
The New Deal
424
Examination for Critics
440
The Poet and His Art
449
The New Poetry
459
The Author at Work
465
FolkLiterature
471
Literati
477
Memorial Service norz
484
Ambrose Bierce
491
Hamlin Garland
498
Ring Lardner
506
Music
523
Brahms
531
More of the Same
537
Bach at Bethlehem
543
The Reward of the Artist
549
The New Architecture
557
The Greenwich Village Complex
564
Arrierepensťe men
570
a Philosophical Discussion
577
The Declaration of Independence in American
583
A Neglected Anniversary
592
The Incomparable Physician
606
People and Things
612
Masculum et F eminam Creavit
619
Arcana Coelestia
625
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Willa Sibert Cather (1873 -1947) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American author who achieved recognition for her novels of frontier life on the Great Plains, works such as O Pioneers!, My Antonia, and The Song of the Lark. In 1923 she was awarded the Pulitzer for One of Ours (1922), a novel set during World War I. Cather grew up in Nebraska and graduated from the state university; she lived in New York for most of her adult life and writing career. In 1896, Cather moved to Pittsburgh after being hired to write for The Home Monthly. She lived in Pittsburgh until 1906.[4] In Pittsburgh, she taught English first at Central High School for one year and then at Allegheny High School, where she also taught Latin and became the head of the English department. She also worked as a telegraph editor and drama critic for the Pittsburgh Leader and frequently contributed to The Library, another local publication. She moved to New York City in 1906 upon receiving a job offer on the editorial staff from McClure's Magazine. Cather and Georgina M. Wells were co-authors of a critical biography of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science. It was serialized in McClure's in 1907-8 and published the next year as a book. Christian Scientists were outraged and tried to buy up every copy. McClure's serialized Cather's first novel, Alexander's Bridge (1912). The work showed her admiration for the style of Henry James. While recognizing her potential, the author Sarah Orne Jewett advised Cather to rely less on James and more on her own experiences in Nebraska. Cather left McClure's in 1912 and began to write full time. Cather returned to the prairie as a setting for inspiration for most of her novels; she also used experiences from her travels in France. Such deeply felt works became both popular and critical successes. Cather was celebrated by national critics such as H.L. Mencken for writing in plainspoken language about ordinary people. When the novelist Sinclair Lewis won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1930, he paid homage to Cather by declaring that she should have won the honor.

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