Missionaries of Revolution: Soviet Advisers and Nationalist China, 1920-1927

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Harvard University Press, 1989 - History - 904 pages
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During the 1920s the Soviet Union made a determined effort to stimulate revolution in China, sending several scores of military and political advisers there, as well as arms and money to influence political developments. The usual secrecy surrounding Soviet foreign intervention was broken when the Chinese government seized a mass of documents in a raid on the Soviet military headquarters in Peking in 1927. 'Missionaries of Revolution' weaves together information gleaned from these documents with contemporary historical materials.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Forming a Tripartite Cooperation 19201923
18
Starting a Revolution with Sun Yatsen February 1923March 1925
79
A List of Names and Positions of Members of the Soviet Group in South China
97
The Revolution Heats Up
140
Conflict among the Revolutionaries amid Preparations for
209
The Chinese Communist Party on the Eve of the Northern
286
First Months of the Northern Expedition SpringDecember 1926
311
Number of Members of the Chinese Communist Party in the National Revolutionary Army MidMarch 1926
685
The Military Section Attached to the Provisional Provincial Commission of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party
686
List of Questions for Guiding Commissions of Control in Charge of Checking on Qualifications of Members of the Chinese Communist Party
689
Young Military Men Association League of Chinese Military Youth
690
Regulations Governing the Military Tribunal of the National Revolutionary Army MidMarch 1926
692
Directives to the Military Tribunal Relating to Penalties
695
Characteristics of Prominent Men of the Kuomintang Before March 20 1926
697
Reactions to the Ckungshan Gunboat Incident of March 20 1926
702

Consolidating Revolutionary Gains and Contesting over Policy
356
Tearing the Revolution Apart
385
Conclusion
413
Introduction
442
to November 1926
472
Short History of Its Origin
479
Developments in Canton 19241925
489
Prospects for Further Work in the South or the Grand Plan
508
Notes on Several Meetings of the Military Council July
517
Extract from the Report Journey to Canton in October 1925
523
Resolutions on the Question of Organization October 1925 550
530
Resolutions on the Question of Propaganda October 1925
536
Our Immediate Attitude Toward the Kuomintang in the North
543
Developments in Kwangtung November 1925March 1926
553
Instructions to the Commissions for Reorganization of the National
562
Draft
574
Plan and Regulations for the Central MilitaryPolitical Academy of
584
Report on the Hong KongCanton Strike March 1926
594
Organization of the Highest Organs for Administration of the Army 676
616
The Training of the National Revolutionary Army for War
623
Characteristics of Enlisted Personnel
629
Report on Sanitary Conditions in the National Revolutionary Army
636
The HighSea and River Patrol Fleet of the Kuomintang Government
644
Political Work in the National Revolutionary Army
654
Regulations Governing the Political Directorate of the National Revolutionary Army March 15 1926
668
Program of Political Lessons for Enlisted Personnel December 1925
672
How to Carry on the Political Education of Officers ca December 1925
677
Regulations Governing Political Commissaries Party Representatives in the National Revolutionary Army MidMarch 1926
679
Letter of the Political Directorate P U R to All Political Commissaries of the National Revolutionary Army MidMarch 1926
682
Stepanovs Report on the March Twentieth Incident ca April 2 1926
703
Stepanovs Report to a Meeting of the Soviet Group at Canton Before April 16 1926
708
Summary Report by Seifulin on Political Developments in Canton in May 1926 777
717
The Chinese Communist Party July 1926
721
Political Report of the Central Committee
722
Resolutions on Relations Between the Chinese Communist Party and the Kuomintang
727
Resolutions on the Question of Organization
730
Resolutions on the Work of the Propaganda Department
735
Resolutions on the Labor Movement
739
Resolutions on the Peasant Movement
745
Resolutions on the Red Spears Movement
750
Resolutions on the Merchants Movement
752
Resolutions on the Womens Movement
754
Resolutions on the Student Movement
756
Resolutions on the Work of the Chinese Communist Youth Corps
758
Resolutions on the Relief Movement
760
Resolutions on the Military Movement
762
The Northern Expedition August 1926March 1927
764
Nefedovs Report on the Eighth Army August 9 1926
765
Instructions to Soviet Advisers on Reporting Military Intelligence September 6 1926
767
The Chinese Communist Partys Proposals on Military and Political Strategy October 13 1926
769
Tairovs Report to Borodin on the Situation at Wuhan October 30 1926
771
Kumanins Report on the Central Military Political Academy
777
Naumovs Report on Military and Political Conditions in Kwangtung
790
Political Report of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist
803
Report of the Taiyuan Executive Committee of the Chinese Communist
829
Liu Likai and Wang Chen Ichiu ichiu chih ichiu erchi nien ti Chungkuo kung
862
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