Guests of the nation

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Poolbeg Press, 1979 - Fiction - 199 pages
2 Reviews

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One of the best books of the genre that show all wars destroy the soul, even if the cause is right damage is still done and actions that would never have been contemplated before the war are easier to commit in the course of it. You could change the location to any of the world's occupation zones and the words will still ring true. 

Review: Guests of the Nation

User Review  - Jim G - Goodreads

I remember it today. I had to look up the story on the internet. It has been 34 years since I read it and I still remember the ending - especially the old woman. All of the fight knocked out of her. Read full review

Contents

Guests Of The Nation
5
Attack
19
Jumbos Wife
29
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1979)

An Irish master of the short story, Frank O'Connor was born Michael O'Donovan in Cork. It is not surprising to learn in the first part of his autobiography, An Only Child (1961), that he took his adored mother's name. O'Connor's absorbing interest was the literary treasury of Ireland. He labored tirelessly over masterful translations of ancient Gaelic works. O'Connor wrote the well-received A Short History of Irish Literature: A Backward Look and edited an anthology of prose and poetry, A Book of Ireland (1959), which contains some of his own translations from the Gaelic. His Shakespeare's Progress (1960) is an appraisal of the bard. In The Lonely Voice: A Study of the Short Story (1963), he examines the work of those he considers the great short story writers of the past. The subjects of his own stories are the middle and lower-middle classes of his beloved Ireland. In his last years, O'Connor lived mostly in the United States, where he taught at Harvard and Northwestern universities.

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