The birds on the trees

Front Cover
Longman, 1970 - Fiction - 196 pages
4 Reviews

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Birds on the Trees

User Review  - Susan Abraham - Goodreads

The Birds on the Trees by Nina Bawden was one of six novels shortlisted for the Lost Man Booker Prize of 1970. I hadn't known this as I picked out, what seemed like an enticing read from a seductive ... Read full review

Review: The Birds on the Trees

User Review  - Bunnychip9 - Goodreads

Dysfunctional family saga that was oddly disconcerting, Bawden packs a punch. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
12
Section 3
27
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1970)

Nina Mary Mobey Bawden was born January 19, 1925 in London, England. When she was eight years old, she wrote an adventure story about a girl who ran away to sea. Educated at Somerville College, Oxford (B.A., 1946; M.A., 1951), Bawden has written more than 30 books, a wide variety of fiction including mysteries, adventure, and romance for both children and adults. Her first adult novel was published in 1953; her first juvenile book ten years later. Bawden's work for children and adults has been acclaimed and honored. Among her adult awards are the Yorkshire Post Novel of the Year Award for Afternoon of a Good Woman (1977) and the Booker Prize Nomination for Circles of Deceit (1987). Her children's awards include the Edgar Allan Poe award nomination for Kept in the Dark (1983) and the Parent's Choice citation for Humbug (1992). Two of Bawden's best known novels for children, Carrie's War and The Peppermint Pig, are based on her own traumatic childhood experiences in London, England, during World War II. As was the custom of the time, she was uprooted, isolated from her family, and sent to a safer area in the country, leaving her to cope with new surroundings and relationships. Similarly, Bawden's fictional characters learn the unfairness and unpredictability of reality. Bawden lives in London.

Bibliographic information