Fascism: The nature of fascism

Front Cover
Roger Griffin, Matthew Feldman
Taylor & Francis, 2004 - Political Science - 416 pages
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The nature of 'fascism' has been hotly contested by scholars since the term was first coined by Mussolini in 1919. However, for the first time since Italian fascism appeared there is now a significant degree of consensus amongst scholars about how to approach the generic term, namely as a revolutionary form of ultra-nationalism. Seen from this perspective, all forms of fascism have three common features: anticonservatism, a myth of ethnic or national renewal and a conception of a nation in crisis. This collection includes articles that show this new consensus, which is inevitably contested, as well as making available material which relates to aspects of fascism independently of any sort of consensus and also covering fascism of the inter and post-war periods.This is a comprehensive selection of texts, reflecting both the extreme multi-faceted nature of fascism as a phenomenon and the extraordinary divergence of interpretations of fascism.
  

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Contents

VI
22
VII
31
VIII
33
IX
42
X
49
XI
53
XII
55
XIII
76
XVI
176
XVII
209
XVIII
219
XIX
221
XX
255
XXI
272
XXII
291
XXIII
305

XIV
81
XV
142
XXIV
327
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