The Sermons of Mr. Yorick ... (Google eBook)

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J. Dodsley, 1775
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Page 96 - If any man among you seem to be religious, and bridleth not his tongue, but deceiveth his own heart, this man's religion is vain.
Page 27 - In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not.
Page 55 - Man that is born of a woman, Is of few days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down: He fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not And dost thou open thine eyes upon such an one.
Page 149 - Let us make a little chamber, I pray thee, on the wall; and let us set for him there a bed, and a table, and a stool, and a candlestick : and it shall be, when he cometh to us, that he shall turn in thither.
Page 135 - Cowards have done good and kind actions ; -cowards have even fought, nay, sometimes even conquered; but a coward never forgave! It is not in his nature ; the power of doing it flows only from a strength and greatness of soul, conscious of its own force and security, and above the little temptations of resenting every fruitless attempt to interrupt its happiness.
Page 95 - Doth a fountain send forth at the same place sweet water and bitter ? Can the fig-tree, my brethren, bear olive berries ? either a vine, figs ? so can no fountain both yield salt water and fresh.
Page 130 - So shall ye say unto Joseph, Forgive, I pray thee, now, the trespass of thy brethren, and their sin ; for they did unto thee evil : and now, we pray thee, forgive the trespass of the servants of the God of thy father.
Page 78 - Consider how great a part of our species, in all ages down to this, have been trod under the feet of cruel and capricious tyrants, who would neither hear their cries nor pity their distresses. Consider slavery what it is how bitter a draught and how many millions are made to drink of it.
Page 216 - ... there is scarce any lot so low, but there is something in it to satisfy the man whom it has befallen ; Providence having so ordered things, that in every man's cup, how bitter soever, there are some cordial drops, some good circumstances, which, if wisely extracted, are sufficient for the purpose he wants them, that is, to make him contented, and, if not happy, at least resigned.

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