The Northmen in Cumberland & Westmoreland (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Longman, 1856 - Cumberland (England) - 228 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 30 - When a chieftain had taken possession of a district, he allotted to each of the freemen who accompanied him a certain portion of land, erected a temple (hof), and became, as he had been in Norway, the chief, the pontiff, and the judge of the herad.
Page 153 - But there is some difference between the natives of Cumberland and those of Yorkshire — the former, though equally firmly knit, being of a less burly build than the inhabitants of the more purely Danish district, and in that respect more nearly resembling the Norwegians. As the people of Norway arc remarkable for the lightness of the hair, particularly in childhood, so I think that any one who...
Page 3 - Thurtell (Thorthill), the treacherous murderer of his friend, did not preserve the worst form of Scandinavian ferocity ? But though a characteristic trait seems sometimes to start up like a family likeness after many generations, Saxon and Dane have long been blended into one people, and in many and varied spheres the descendants of the Northmen have obtained renown. Arnold...
Page 63 - Anglo-Saxon forefathers ? for that we derive the word mediately from them, and not immediately from the Greek, is certain. What contact, direct or indirect, was there between the languages to account for this ? The explanation is curious. While the AngloSaxons and other tribes of the Teutonic stock were almost universally converted through contact with the Latin church in the western provinces of the Roman Empire, or by its missionaries, yet it came to pass that before this, some of the Goths on...
Page 84 - Edgar etheling with him. A. 1092. This year king William went northward to Carlisle with a large army, and he repaired the city, and built the castle. And he drove out Dolfin, who had before governed that country; and having placed a garrison in the castle, he returned into the south, and sent a great number of rustic Englishmen thither, with their wives and cattle, that they might settle there and cultivate the land.
Page 5 - Norse — hnnr, a noble or illustrious person, a king ; and allr, all — ' all king,' an appropriate title enough for the ' king of all Ireland.' The name Council," continues this writer, " is by no means an uncommon one in the North of England, where it might most naturally be supposed to be derived from the Danes or Northmen. The respective prefixes ' 0 ' and ' Me,' in Ireland and Scotland, might indicate a cross between the natives and the Northern settlers,
Page 88 - In thus referring to myself for the character of the mountain, he does not at all suppose that he is referring to the author of the etymology. On the contrary, the very next sentence says — 'I do not know who is the author of this etymology, which has been quoted by several writers; but it appears to me to be open to considerable doubt'; and this for two separate reasons, which he assigns, and which I will notice a little further on. Meantime I pause, for the sake of saying that the derivation...
Page 34 - In the early part of the (Icelandic) commonwealth, when a man was suspected of theft, a kind of tribunal composed of twelve persons named by him, and twelve by the person whose goods had been stolen, was instituted before the door of his dwelling, and hence called a door-doom ; but as this manner of proceeding generally ended in bloodshed, it was abolished.
Page 63 - the house which is the Lord's." But here a difficulty meets us. How explain the presence of a Greek word in the vocabulary of our Anglo-Saxon forefathers ? for that we derive the word mediately from them, and not immediately from the Greek, is certain. What contact, direct or indirect, was there between the languages to account for this ? The explanation is curious. While the Anglo-Saxons and other tribes of the Teutonic stock were almost universally converted by their contact with the Latin church...
Page 4 - ... Might we," says Ferguson,« " even go on to ask — but here we tread on tender ground — whether O'Connell (was more than half an Irishman ? Konall seems to have been a common name among the Norsemen : there are six of that name mentioned in the Landnámaíok, or list of original settlers in Iceland.

Bibliographic information