Moby Dick the Whale Volume I EasyRead Co

Front Cover
ReadHowYouWant.com, Nov 1, 2006 - Fiction - 544 pages
0 Reviews
This is a classic adventurous novel by Herman Melville with metaphysical conjecture. The novel follows the experiences of the author in vast seas with the dramatic narration. A story of all-consuming obsession; everything about the book is whale-like in its vastness, its richness and its power. Captivating due to its philosophical depths!
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CHAPTER 1
1
CHAPTER 2
10
CHAPTER 3
16
CHAPTER 4
41
CHAPTER 5
48
CHAPTER 6
52
CHAPTER 7
56
CHAPTER 8
61
CHAPTER 34
245
CHAPTER 35
254
CHAPTER 36
265
CHAPTER 37
278
CHAPTER 38
281
CHAPTER 39
283
CHAPTER 40
285
CHAPTER 41
296

CHAPTER 9
65
CHAPTER 10
80
CHAPTER 11
87
CHAPTER 12
90
CHAPTER 13
94
CHAPTER 14
102
CHAPTER 15
106
CHAPTER 16
112
CHAPTER 17
136
CHAPTER 18
146
CHAPTER 19
153
CHAPTER 20
159
CHAPTER 21
163
CHAPTER 22
169
CHAPTER 23
177
CHAPTER 24
179
CHAPTER 25
187
CHAPTER 26
189
CHAPTER 27
194
CHAPTER 28
201
CHAPTER 29
207
CHAPTER 30
212
CHAPTER 31
214
CHAPTER 32
218
CHAPTER 33
240
CHAPTER 42
312
CHAPTER 43
327
CHAPTER 44
329
CHAPTER 45
338
CHAPTER 46
353
CHAPTER 47
358
CHAPTER 48
363
CHAPTER 49
380
CHAPTER 50
384
CHAPTER 51
389
CHAPTER 52
396
CHAPTER 53
400
CHAPTER 54
407
CHAPTER 55
442
CHAPTER 56
450
CHAPTER 57
456
CHAPTER 58
461
CHAPTER 59
466
CHAPTER 60
471
CHAPTER 61
477
CHAPTER 62
486
CHAPTER 63
489
CHAPTER 64
492
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Melville was born into a seemingly secure, prosperous world, a descendant of prominent Dutch and English families long established in New York State. That security vanished when first, the family business failed, and then, two years later, in young Melville's thirteenth year, his father died. Without enough money to gain the formal education that professions required, Melville was thrown on his own resources and in 1841 sailed off on a whaling ship bound for the South Seas. His experiences at sea during the next four years were to form in part the basis of his best fiction. Melville's first two books, Typee (1846) and Omoo (1847), were partly romance and partly autobiographical travel books set in the South Seas. Both were popular successes, particularly Typee, which included a stay among cannibals and a romance with a South Sea maiden. During the next several years, Melville published three more romances that drew upon his experiences at sea: Redburn (1849) and White-Jacket (1850), both fairly realistic accounts of the sailor's life and depicting the loss of innocence of central characters; and Mardi (1849), which, like the other two books, began as a romance of adventure but turned into an allegorical critique of contemporary American civilization. Moby Dick (1851) also began as an adventure story, based on Melville's experiences aboard the whaling ship. However, in the writing of it inspired in part by conversations with his friend and neighbor Hawthorne and partly by his own irrepressible imagination and reading of Shakespeare and other Renaissance dramatists Melville turned the book into something so strange that, when it appeared in print, many of his readers and critics were dumbfounded, even outraged. Their misgivings were in no way resolved by the publication in 1852 of his next novel, Pierre; or, the Ambiguities Pierre; or, the Ambiguities, a deeply personal, desperately pessimistic work that tells of the moral ruination of an innocent young man. By the mid-1850s, Melville's literary reputation was all but destroyed, and he was obliged to live the rest of his life taking whatever jobs he could find and borrowing money from relatives, who fortunately were always in a position to help him. He continued to write, however, and published some marvelous short fiction pieces Benito Cereno" (1855) and "Bartleby, the Scrivener" (1853) are the best. He also published several volumes of poetry, the most important of which was Battle Pieces and Aspects of the War (1866), poems of occasionally great power that were written in response to the moral challenge of the Civil War. His posthumously published work, Billy Budd (1924), on which he worked up until the time of his death, is Melville's last significant literary work, a brilliant short novel that movingly describes a young sailor's imprisonment and death. Melville's reputation, however, rests most solidly on his great epic romance, Moby Dick. It is a difficult as well as a brilliant book, and many critics have offered interpretations of its complicated ambiguous symbolism. Darrel Abel briefly summed up Moby Dick as "the story of an attempt to search the unsearchable ways of God," although the book has historical, political, and moral implications as well.

Bibliographic information