Handbook of Rural Health

Front Cover
Sana Loue, Beth E. Quill
Springer US, May 31, 2001 - Medical - 370 pages
1 Review
This book integrates the expertise of profession tion available on the various health concerns and als from a broad array of disciplines-anthro subpopulations and by the numerous method pology, health services research, epidemiology, ological complexities in compiling the neces medicine, dentistry, health promotion, and so sary data. Recognition of the nuances within and cial work-in an examination of rural health across rural populations, as recommended here, care and rural health research. This investiga will allow us to provide care more efficiently tion includes an inquiry into issues that are uni and effectively and to prevent disease or ame versal across rural populations, such as public liorate its effects. Reliance on some of the newer health issues and issues of equity in health care. technologies and approaches discussed here, Several chapters explore the health care issues such as distance learning and broad-based, com that confront specified subpopulations includ munity-wide health initiatives, will facilitate ing, for instance, migrant workers and Native disease treatment and prevention in relatively Americans, while others provide a more focused isolated areas. Ultimately, all of us must work approach to diseases that may disproportionately to ensure the availability of adequate health care have an impact on residents of rural areas, such to even the most isolated communities, for "as as specific chronic and infectious diseases.

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About the author (2001)

Sana Loue is Professor of Epidemiology and Director of the Center for Minority Public Health at Case Western Reserve University. She also holds appointments in the Departments of Bioethics, Psychiatry, and Global Health. Loue is the author of more than a dozen books on gender, ethnicity, immigration, and health. Over a two-year period, the author and her research team followed the lives of fifty-three Puerto Rican women living with severe mental illness as they coped with daily challenges in the areas of family, romantic relationships, employment, social services, substance use, and health care. The team interviewed the women and shadowed them at their homes, churches, schools, physicians' offices, family events, and other occasions in order to understand how their mental illness, their gender, their language, and their culture affected their relationships with others, their understandings of their own situations, and their hopes for themselves and their families.

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