Broken Piano for President

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Eraserhead Press, Feb 29, 2012 - Fiction - 362 pages
8 Reviews

The greatest political allegory since Animal Farm, written by the most fantastic-smelling author of our time.

Ever drank too much and forgot what happened? Don't be embarrassed. Deshler Dean faces this problem every day of his life.

Dean is far more brilliant and productive when he's blackout drunk. In the last few months alone, he has invented a hamburger more addictive than crystal meth, scored a six-figure record contract for his terrible art rock band, and started dating a woman he doesn't even recognize. Worse yet, he has become entangled in the biggest war since the Allies took on Germany.

When rival fast food chains duke it out for control over Dean's burger-inventing genius, Dean and his band mates plunge into the absurd world of corporate paranoia and greed. As the violence of the burger wars spills out onto the streets, it's up to them to win over the hearts (and stomachs) of the American people and save the country from the equivalent of a deep-fried nuclear warhead.

With the humor of Christopher Moore and the madcap sprawl of Thomas Pynchon, "Broken Piano for President" is a comic masterpiece about the fast food industry, booze, and the necessity to choose happiness over work and security.

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Review: Broken Piano for President

User Review  - Ross Walker - Goodreads

Good stuff. Really respect the Butthole Surfers references. Folks like Gibby give a lot of hope to dudes in Texas with library cards. A lot of people are calling this bizarro but I'd classify it as general badassery. It transcends genre, really. Like Bolano or Korn. Solid as fuck either way. Read full review

Review: Broken Piano for President

User Review  - Andy Pronti - Goodreads

At first I found this novel to be really confusing. It's told through the eyes of a black out drunk who has no memory of the previous nights events. As the reader you won't know what's going on either ... Read full review

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