The Loss of Self: A Family Resource for the Care of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2002 - Family & Relationships - 461 pages
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This fully revised and updated edition gives the latest information on causes, preventive measures, diagnosis, treatment, and drugs. But The Loss of Self goes even further than the biological, medical, and social issues to explore the emotional challenges any person coping with Alzheimer's will experience. Personal stories give hope, dignity, and ideas for solving even the most difficult problems such as sexuality, violence, abuse, and family conflict. The Loss of Self speaks to those suffering from Alzheimer's and to family members wanting to understand how to help a relative and to meet their own needs over the long years of caring.
  

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The loss of self: a family resource for the care of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders

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The authors offer timely and necessary advice for the families of the more than two million Americans facing various dementias. The book reflects state of the art information as well as the authors ... Read full review

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Contents

The Loss of Self
21
The Diagnosis of Dementia
38
Reactions to the Diagnosis
68
Setting Goals after the Diagnosis
93
Medications to Cure Alzheimers Disease Where Are We?
131
Drugs Helpful and Harmful
143
Ways of Caring
170
LongTerm Care at Home
210
Choosing a Nursing Home If the Time Comes
300
Death and Dying
322
What Scientists Know about the Causes of Alzheimers Disease
363
The Cost of Caring
389
Selected Readings and Internet Resources
411
National and International Alzheimer Organizations
419
National Organizations on Aging
422
Administration on Aging and State Agencies on Aging
429

Coping with the Stress of Caring
232
Depression Getting the Help You Need
261
Rehabilitation A Focus on Function
280

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About the author (2002)

Donna Cohen is a professor in the Department of Aging and Mental Health at the University of South Florida.

Carl Eisdorfer is chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Miami.

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