Handbook of weather, climate, and water: atmospheric chemistry, hydrology, and societal impacts

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Wiley-Interscience, 2003 - Nature - 966 pages
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The Handbook of Weather, Climate, and Water: Atmospheric Chemistry, Hydrology, and Societal Impacts is the first of two stand-alone volumes that will be landmarks in the meteorological literature for many years to come. Each volume encompasses both fundamental topics and critical issues that have recently surfaced in studies of the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Renowned experts have contributed to every part of this handbook. Each overview chapter is followed by topic-specific chapters written by specialists who present comprehensive discussions at a greater level of detail and complexity.

The Handbook of Weather, Climate, and Water: Atmospheric Chemistry, Hydrology, and Societal Impacts covers topics that are essential for grasping the scientific bases of major issues such as global climate warming, the ozone hole, acid rain, floods, droughts, and other natural disasters. Cross-references between chapters allow readers to easily pursue a specific interest beyond a particular subtopic or individual chapter.  Other topics include:

-Aerosols and smog
-Cloud chemistry
-Greenhouse gases
-Remote sensing techniques in hydrology
-Hydrologic forecasting and simulation
-Tropical deforestation effects on the climate system
-Societal impacts of the El Niņo phenomenon

The Handbook of Weather, Climate, and Water: Atmospheric Chemistry, Hydrology, and Societal Impacts will be an essential addition to the libraries of professionals and academics in the environmental sciences, and a valuable source book for university and technical libraries throughout the world.

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Contents

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY
3
A Complex Interaction
11
Carbon Monoxide Nitrogen Oxides and Oxidizing Capacity
18
Copyright

178 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

THOMAS D. POTTER, PhD, is Professor of Meteorology at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, and Director of NOAA Cooperative Institute for Regional Prediction.
BRADLEY R. COLMAN, ScD, is Science Operations Officer for the National Weather Association in Seattle, Washington, and holds affiliate faculty positions with the University of Washington and the University of Idaho.

Both are Fellows of the American Meteorology Society.