Helliconia Summer

Front Cover
Ibooks, Aug 1, 2002 - Fiction - 416 pages
10 Reviews
A planet orbiting binary suns, Helliconia has a Great Year spanning three millennia of Earth time: cultures are born in spring, flourish in summer, then die with the onset of the generations-long winter.

It is the summer of the Great Year on Helliconia. The humans are involved with their own affairs. Their old enemies, the phagors, are comparatively docile at this time of year, yet they can afford to wait, to take advantage of human weakness?and the king's weakness. How they do so brings to a climax this powerfully compelling novel, in which the tortuous unwindings of circumstance enmesh royalty and commoners alike, and involve the Helliconia continents.

This is the second volume of the Helliconia Trilogy?a monumental saga that goes beyond anything yet created by this master among today's imaginative writers.

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Review: Helliconia Summer (Helliconia #2)

User Review  - Goodreads

If you can get passed the sheer volume of this trilogy you'll find a well thought through universe that Aldiss has clearly put a lot of thought into. Sadly for me this didn't really get going until ... Read full review

Review: Helliconia Summer (Helliconia #2)

User Review  - Goodreads

This is a series that has haunted me ever since I read it. Read full review

About the author (2002)

Brian W. Aldiss was born in East Dereham, Norfolk on August 18, 1925. In 1943, he joined the Royal Signals regiment, and saw action in Burma. After World War II, he worked as a bookseller at Oxford University. His first book, The Brightfount Diaries, was published in 1955. His first science fiction novel, Non-Stop (Starship in the United States), was published in 1958. His other works include Hothouse, The Helliconia Trilogy, The Squire Quartet, Frankenstein Unbound, The Malacia Tapestry, Walcot, and Mortal Morning. His short story Super-Toys Last All Summer Long was the basis for the film A.I. Artificial Intelligence. He has received numerous awards for his work including two Hugo Awards, the Nebula Award, and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He is also an anthologist and an artist. He has edited numerous works including Introducing SF, The Penguin Science Fiction Omnibus, Space Opera, Space Odysseys, Galactic Empires, Evil Earths, and Perilous Planets. He is an abstract artist and his first solo exhibition, The Other Hemisphere, was held in Oxford in August-September 2010.

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