Dorothy of Oz

Front Cover
HarperCollins, Oct 16, 1989 - Juvenile Fiction - 176 pages
7 Reviews
Afterword by Peter Glassman. "Dorothy is called back to Oz by Glinda, the Good Witch of the South, because the Tin Woodman, the Scarecrow, and the Cowardly Lion need help....The great-grandson of L. Frank Baum here adds to the Oz canon with a story that is true to the originals....Oz fans will welcome this new adventure."--Booklist.
  

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Review: Dorothy of Oz (Keepsake Adventures of Oz #1)

User Review  - Landon - Goodreads

I read this book a while back, before I knew it would be made into a movie. To be honest, I did not think that there would be any pictures in the book, until I received it in my mailbox. It is written ... Read full review

Review: Dorothy of Oz (Keepsake Adventures of Oz #1)

User Review  - Cj Nelson - Goodreads

This is one of my favorite children's books and I'm glad Roger Baum continued writing. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
14
Section 3
20
Section 4
35
Section 5
41
Section 6
51
Section 7
53
Section 8
57
Section 10
72
Section 11
99
Section 12
104
Section 13
112
Section 14
120
Section 15
162
Section 16
164
Copyright

Section 9
62

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 168 - TA TROLLOPE. An Idle Excursion. By MARK TWAIN. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. By MARK TWAIN. A Pleasure Trip on the Continent of Europe. By M. TWAIN.
Page 74 - It was so dark they couldn't see their hands in front of their faces.
Page 27 - The next morning, I woke up and thought it was all a bad dream.
Page 41 - Her thoughts were interrupted by the sound of a key in the lock. "Don't forget me, Dorothy," the China Doll Princess said.
Page 164 - L. Frank Baum wrote The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, the last thing he was thinking about was writing a series of stories about Dorothy and the Land of Oz.

References to this book

About the author (1989)

Elizabeth Miles, illustrator of Dorothy of Oz by Roger S. Baum, lives in Laguna Beach, California.

Bibliographic information