Richard Wagner (Google eBook)

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S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1881 - 112 pages
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Page 38 - Tannhauser," and was astonished at recognizing my second self in his achievement. What I had felt in inventing this music he felt in performing it ; what I wanted to express in writing it down he proclaimed in making it sound.
Page 37 - at Dresden attracted general attention. He was surprised to find himself misunderstood with such violence by a man whom he had scarcely known, and whose acquaintance r 1VAGNER. 37 now seemed not without value to him. I am still touched at recollecting the repeated and eager attempts he made to change my opinion of him, even before he knew any of my works. He acted not from any artistic sympathy, but led by the purely human wish of discontinuing a casual disharmony between himself and another being...
Page 36 - In this world, into which it had been my desire to fly from my narrow circumstances , Liszt had grown up from his earliest age, so as to be the object of general love and admiration, at a time when I was repulsed by general coldness and want of sympathy. In consequence I looked upon him with suspicion. I had no opportunity of disclosing my being and working to him, and therefore the reception I met with on his part was altogether of a superficial kind; as was indeed natural in a man to whom every...
Page 37 - He ceased his wanderings, settled down at the small, modest Weimar, and took up the conductor's baton, after having been at home so long in the splendour of the greatest cities of Europe. At Weimar I saw him for the last time, when I rested a few days in Thuringia, not yet certain whether the threatening prosecution would compel me to continue my flight from Germany.
Page 38 - Lohengrin, totally forgotten by me. Suddenly I felt something like compassion, that this music should never sound from off the death-pale paper. Two words I wrote to Liszt ; his answer was, the news that preparations for the performance were being made on the largest scale that the limited means of Weimar would permit.
Page 36 - I met Liszt for the first time during my earliest stay in Paris, at a period when I had renounced the hope, nay, even a wish of a Paris reputation, and, indeed, was in a state of internal revolt against the artistic life which I found there.
Page 43 - It could, therefore, not enter my mind to engraft on this my musical form, growing as it did out of the nature of the scenes, the traditional forms of operatic music, which could not but have marred and interrupted its organic development.
Page 38 - What was to be done to supply what was wanted, so as to further the true understanding on all sides, and with it the ultimate success of the work? Liszt saw it at once and did it. He gave to the public his own impression of the work in a manner the convincing eloquence and overpowering efficacy of which remain unequalled.
Page 37 - I heard from all the different corners of the world, where he had been on his artistic excursions, how he had everywhere expressed his delight with my music, and indeed had I would rather believe unintentionally canvassed people's opinions in my favour. " This happened at a time when it became more and more evident that my dramatic works would have no outward success. But just when the case seemed desperate, Liszt succeeded by his own energy in opening a hopeful refuge to my art.
Page 36 - I was repulsed by general coldness and want of sympathy. In consequence I looked upon him with suspicion. I had no opportunity of disclosing my being and working to him, and therefore the reception I met with on his part was altogether of a superficial kind; as was indeed natural in a man to whom every day the most divergent impressions claimed access. But I was not in a mood to look with unprejudiced eyes for the natural cause of...

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