Hesperides: Or, The Works Both Humane and Divine of Robert Herrick ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Little, Brown, 1856 - English poetry
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 123 - And as a vapour or a drop of rain Once lost, can ne'er be found again; So when or you or I are made A fable, song, or fleeting shade, All love, all liking, all delight Lies drowned with us in endless night.
Page 182 - Or bid me love, and I will give A loving heart to thee. A heart as soft, a heart as kind, A heart as sound and free As in the whole world thou canst find, That heart I'll give to thee.
Page 144 - Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry ; For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry.
Page 123 - Our life is short, and our days run As fast away as does the sun. And, as a vapour or a drop of rain, Once lost, can ne'er be found again, So when or you or I are made A fable, song, or fleeting shade, All love, all liking, all delight Lies drown'd with us in endless night. Then, while time serves, and we are but decaying, Come, my Corinna, come, let's go a-Maying.
Page 122 - As if here were those cooler shades of love. Can such delights be in the street " And open fields and we not see't ? Come, we'll abroad; and let's obey The proclamation made for May : And sin no more, as we have done, by staying; But, my Corinna, come, let's go a-Maying.
Page 58 - The Rock of Rubies: and The quarrie of Pearls SOME ask'd me where the Rubies grew? And nothing I did say: But with my finger pointed to The lips of Julia. Some ask'd how Pearls did grow, and where? Then spoke I to my Girle, To part her lips, and shew'd them there The Quarelets of Pearl.
Page 254 - Good morning to this primrose too ; Good morrow to each maid ; That will with flowers the tomb bestrew Wherein my Love is laid. Ah ! woe is me, woe, woe is me, Alack and well-a-day ! For pity, sir, find out that bee, Which bore my Love away. I'll seek him in your bonnet brave ; I'll seek him in your eyes ; Nay, now I think they've made his grave I' th
Page 284 - Twas pity Nature brought ye forth Merely to show your worth, And lose you quite. But you are lovely leaves, where we May read how soon things have Their end, though ne'er so brave: And after they have shown their pride Like you, awhile, they glide Into the grave.
Page 72 - To ELECTRA. MORE white then whitest lillies far, Or snow, or whitest swans you are : More white then are the whitest creames, Or moone-light tinselling the streames : More white then pearls, or Juno's thigh ; Or Pelops arme of yvorie.
Page 322 - The Fairies. If ye will with Mab find grace, Set each platter in his place : Rake the fier up, and get Water in, ere sun be set. Wash your pailes, and dense your dairies, Sluts are loathsome to the fairies ! Sweep your house ; Who doth not so, Mab will pinch her by the toe.

Bibliographic information