Greetings from the Salton Sea: folly and intervention in the Southern California landscape, 1905-2005

Front Cover
Center for American Places, Sep 1, 2005 - History - 136 pages
3 Reviews
The Salton Sea is a man-made catastrophe, redolent with the smell of algae and decomposing fish. Nevertheless, the lake's vast, placid expanses continue to attract birdwatchers, tourists and artists. In Greetings from the Salton Sea, photographer Kim Stringfellow explores the history of California's largest lake from its disastrous beginningsthe "sea" was formed when Colorado River levees broke and spilled into a depression 280 feet below sea levelto its heyday as a desert paradise in the 1950s and its current state as an environmental battleground. Like the 400-plus species of birds that use the lake as a halfway point in their annual migration, developers flocked to the water too: they planted palm trees, built golf courses, and hired showstoppers such as the Beach Boys to perform at area resorts. These days, politicians seek to redirect the lake's only source of replenishmentagricultural runoff from surrounding farmsto water golf courses and green lawns elsewhere. Greetings from the Salton Sea's photographs capture the war among policymakers, environmentalists, developers, and the individuals still living along the lake's shores. As Stringfellow aptly documents, it is a war for water and, ultimately, for existence.

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Review: Greetings from the Salton Sea: Folly and Intervention in the Southern California Landscape, 1905-2005

User Review  - John - Goodreads

Great photographs of the Salton Sea. I especially love the still lifes created using collected materials fromt the seaside. Captures well the enigmatic quality of the area. Visceral like the sea itslelf. Read full review

Review: Greetings from the Salton Sea: Folly and Intervention in the Southern California Landscape, 1905-2005

User Review  - Amber - Goodreads

Fantastic images of a land only recently forgotten, but one abandoned with such fervor that its feels as though this spot on Earth is just the first to wither and die -- a portent of the fall of man. Read full review

Contents

MAP OF THE SALTON
4
FOLLY INTERVENTION AND THE FUTURE
18
NOTES ON THE TEXT
123

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About the author (2005)

Kim Stringfellow is an associate professor in the School of Art, Design, and Art History at San Diego State University. She is the author of Jackrabbit Homestead Tracing the Small Tract Act in the Southern California Landscape, 19382008.

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