Convention and Transgression: The Theatre of Emilio Carballido (Google eBook)

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Bucknell University Press, 1997 - Literary Criticism - 256 pages
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Emilio Carballido is one of the most prominent, influential, and prolific of contemporary Hispanic playwrights. He has had a greater influence on Mexican theatre than any other dramatist in history, while outside his country he is known as the ambassador of Mexican theatre. The present study traces several specific dramatic forms over several decades and thus provides a solid basis for a comprehensive view of Carballido's dramatic evolution. This study seeks to define and redefine the dramatic forms that he has reshaped to capture the ambiguous, complex, and changing nature of the modern world and human behavior.
  

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Contents

IV
29
V
51
VI
84
VII
126
VIII
151
IX
168
X
194
XI
206
XII
213
XIII
234
XIV
238
XV
253
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Page 31 - from Kierkegaard's philosophy of life as something inherently and contradictorily comic: "the comical is present in every stage of life, for wherever there is life there is contradiction, and wherever there is contradiction the comical is present.
Page 36 - as marginal members of the final society. In typical comedic structure, the original society, "controlled by habit, ritual bondage, arbitrary law and the older characters," gives way, according to Northrop Frye, to "a society controlled by youth and pragmatic freedom.
Page 36 - Lorenzo, as Rosalba's opposite and the opposition, fits neatly into Levin's category of comic killjoy: "They cannot make a joke; they cannot take a joke; they cannot see the joke; they spoil the game. Humorless and unconsciously humorous . . . they cannot adapt their preconceptions to actuality, when it unavoidably presses upon their lives.
Page 31 - This capacity to transcend or to overcome corresponds to what theorist Robert Corrigan identifies as the comic view of life: "the sense that no matter how many times man is knocked down he somehow manages to pull himself up and keep on going.

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