The Takelma Language of Southwestern Oregon (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1912 - Takelma language - 296 pages
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Page 290 - Neither the very extended use of reduplication in Takelma, nor the frequent use in Athapascan of distinct verb-stems for the singular and plural, is shared by the other. Add to this the fact that the phonetic systems of Athapascan and Takelma are more greatly divergent than would naturally be expected of neighboring languages, and it becomes clear that the opinion that has generally been held, though based on practically no evidence, in regard to the entirely distinct characteristics of the two linguistic...
Page 95 - In looking over the many examples of verb and corresponding aorist stems obtained, it was found possible to make out sixteen types of stem-relations. Of this large number of types about half are of frequent occurrence, while of each of the rest but few examples have been found. It is not claimed for a moment that all of these types should be regarded as being exactly on a par, but merely that they have the value of forming a convenient systematization of the somewhat bewildering mass of methods of...
Page 8 - Boas for his valuable advice in regard to several points of method and for his active interest in the progress of the work. It is due largely to him that I was encouraged to depart from the ordinary rut of grammatical description and to arrange and interpret the facts in a manner that seemed most in accordance with the spirit of the Takelma language itself.1 PHONOLOGY (2-24) 2. Introductory In its general phonetic character, at least as regards relative harshness or smoothness of acoustic...
Page 138 - DIE TOGETHER WITH. The reason seems clear. While the action of a causative verb is logically transitive, that of a comitative is really intransitive, and the verb is only formally transitive. In the former case the subject of the verb does not undergo the action that would be expressed by the intransitive stem (lohoi-) ; in the latter it does. Examples of the comitative are: Comitative yank...
Page 102 - I and g (Type 3), or from p'el-gby the addition of the -e- to a base p'el- (Type 2). From a purely descriptive point of view, then, the most typical aorist formation in Takelma may be said to be characterized by the repetition of the stemvowel immediately after the first consonant following the stem-vowel. From the point of view of vocalic quantity the verbs of Type 3 fall into the same two classes as those of Type 2 such as have a short vowel in the stem...
Page 91 - ... they became in river ( = were drowned) 166.16 x&mea'lyowos he looked down from top of mountain 124.4 (contrast pl&isa'lyowoc he looked down from ground 26.14) 37 38. INSTRUMENTAL wait is somewhat difficult to classify this prefix, as it does not belong either to the body-part or the purely local group. Strictly speaking it should be considered the incorporated form of the demonstrative pronoun in its instrumental function. As was seen above, it may represent an instrumental noun, but, while...
Page 10 - Tc!ema?nk' he made it From this and numberless other examples it follows that au and an, similarly ai, al, and am, belong, from a strictly Takelma point of view, to the same series of phonetic elements; similarly for e, i, o, and u diphthongs.
Page 54 - It needs but a moment's thought to bring home the general psychic identity of such stem-variability and the "ablaut" of many German verbs, or the Latin stem-variation in present and perfect : frang- :freg- break da- : ded- give If the typical verb (and, for that matter, noun) form of Takelma is thus found to be a firm phonetic and psychic unit, and to be characterized by some of the supposed earmarks of inflection, what is left but to frankly call the language "inflectional" ? " Polysynthetic" and...
Page 28 - The first form was, for some reason or other, often heard, perhaps misheard, as s'isul^. 10. INORGANIC a It frequently happens in the formation of words that a vowel present in some other form of the stem will drop out, or, more accurately expressed, has never been inserted. Consonant-combinations sometimes then result which are either quite impossible in Takelma phonetics, or at any rate are limited in their occurrence to certain grammatical forms, so that the introduction of an " inorganic "...
Page 35 - SHELL), the fortes ts! and ts~! corresponding, respectively, in place of articulation to s and s\ The two sounds s and s- have been put together, as it is hardly probable that they represent morphologically distinct sounds, but seem rather to be the limits of a normal range of variation (both sal- WITH FOOT and s'oZ-, eg, were heard).

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