The Golden Bough (Abridged): A Study in Magic and Religion (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Religion
6 Reviews
Sir James George Frazer developed an affinity for classic literature at a young age, which developed into a very real talent through his schooling at Glasgow University and then Trinity College at Cambridge, where he remained as a Classics Fellow for all but one year of his life. After the success of his first novel, "Totemism", in 1887, Frazer set out to create what was to become his defining work, "The Golden Bough: A Study in Comparative Religion". Originally a two-volume edition, the work expanded into multiple volumes, which in 1922 he edited down to the most widely-read abridged version, which has been reproduced here for this edition. It was initially celebrated as a remarkable study of comparative anthropology, but was later discredited by scientists because Frazer did not follow standard scientific procedures. Nevertheless, it could not be denied the work was an incredible literary accomplishment, influential towards the development of Western thought and such great 20th century thinkers as Freud, Anatole France, Margaret Mead, and Oswald Spengler.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LisaMaria_C - LibraryThing

The Foreword compares Frazer and Golden Bough in its impact to such revolutionary thinkers of the 19th Century as Darwin, Marx, and Freud. This seminal work of anthropology and comparative religion ... Read full review

Review: The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion: A New Abridgement from the Second and Third Editions

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

As outdated as it is, this is still a critical text, if only to observe a key moment in the history of the discipline. Highly influential, although some of Frazer's anti-Christian polemic has long since been refuted by secular as well as Christian scholarship. Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
17
III
19
IV
48
V
58
VI
76
VII
82
VIII
95
XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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IX
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XIV
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XLIII
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XLV
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LIII
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LIV
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LVI
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LIX
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LX
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LXI
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LXII
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LXIII
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LXIV
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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About the author (2004)

James George Frazer was a British social anthropologist, folklorist, and classical scholar who taught for most of his life at Trinity College, Cambridge. Greatly influenced by Edward Burnett Tylor's Primitive Culture, published in 1871, he wrote The Golden Bough (1890), a massive reconstruction of the whole of human thought and custom through the successive stages of magic, religion, and science.The Golden Bough is regarded by many today as a much-loved but antiquated relic, but, by making anthropological data and knowledge academically respectable, Frazer made modern comparative anthropology possible.

Bibliographic information