E.A.R.L.: The Autobiography of DMX

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HarperCollins, Oct 21, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
31 Reviews

The dark journey of a boy who became a man, the man who became an artist, and the artist who became an icon. A talent for rhyme saved his life, but the demons and sins of his past continue to haunt him.

This is the story of Earl Simmons.

  

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Review: EARL: The Autobiography of DMX

User Review  - John L. - Goodreads

This revealing account of the life of Earl Simmons, aka DMX, will grip you as you discover more and more of what lies at the core of this rapper's mind and soul. Growing up tough in the streets of New ... Read full review

Review: EARL: The Autobiography of DMX

User Review  - Brion Williams - Goodreads

This was a great book. I enjoyed every minute of it. I remember not wanting to put the book down and reading all night. Which I feel is a sign that a book is great because you can not pry yourself ... Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
1
First Memories
7
Turn Out the Lights
92
Interlude
115
Interlude
147
Before Light There Is Dark
193
Slippin Fallin
202
A Bark in the Dark
208
Niggas Done Started Something
234
Payback on Ravine
243
One More Road to Cross
251
Who Is That Last Guy?
265
Official Member of Society
271
Def Jam 1
281
Acknowledgments
341
Copyright

The Battle for New York
221

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 215 - O Lord my God, if I have done this; if there be iniquity in my hands; 4 If I have rewarded evil unto him...
Page 38 - If it comes back to you it's yours. If it doesn't it never was.
Page 92 - Put the dog up against the fence!" My first instinct was to run, but I didn't know if Blacky could keep up with me and I didn't want them to start shooting at my dog. "Tie your dog against the fence and step this way.
Page 92 - But 1986, well, that was something else . . . It was Peanut's fault. He lived in building 10. He had been talking shit to me all morning so me and Blacky chased him right upstairs into his hallway. His mother heard us arguing and came out with a frying pan in her hand, so I went back downstairs to catch him later. Ten minutes later, the police rolled up.
Page 322 - I've given you a talent to rhyme. I may not come when you call, but I'm always on time.5* The next verse advises abandonment of violence and encourages faith and connection with the Creator No! Put down the guns and write a new rhyme. "You'll get it all in due time. You'll do fine. Just have faith cuz you mine, (uh huh) And when you shine It's goin
Page 95 - What, man, what? It can happen . . . Run your fucking pockets!" I came home with about four dollars. A few days later, I was behind bars. It was dark and hell is hot.
Page 92 - NlNETEEN-EIGHTY-FIVE WAS THE BEST YEAR OF MY LIFE. I had survived my time in group home. I was back in Yonkers. I had a dog I called my own. Nineteen-eighty-five was the year I started robbing, running, fucking, the year I first heard "Silver Shadow," and the year that I bought my first pair of Timberlands.
Page 95 - ... detergent. I took them. I would lift coats out of my mother's closet, sweaters from my sisters, or swipe old clothes of my own that were still in my room anything that would get me closer to that next high. It didn't matter to me. There was a voice in my head louder and more powerful than anything I had ever heard before, and it wouldn't stop yelling.
Page 83 - I also knew that there was no way in the world I was going to be able to stop before I got there.
Page 322 - My child, I've watched you grow up and I've been there Even at those times you least suspected it I was there. And look at what I've given you. A talent to rhyme. I may not come when you call but I'm always on time. Chorus Somebody's knockin', should I let 'em in? Lord we're just starting, but where will it end? (repeat) But when the funds are low the guns will blow. Lookin' for that one that owe, make 'em run that dough.

About the author (2003)

Smokey D. Fontaine is the former music editor of The Source and coauthor of What's Your HI-FI Q? He has written extensively about the entire spectrum of hip-hop and rhythm and blues for more than a decade. He lives in New York.

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