Journal of Botany, British and Foreign (Google eBook)

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Robert Hardwicke, 1904 - Botany
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Page 32 - A LOVER'S DIARY. Fcap. Svo. 5j. A volume of poems. Parkes (AK). SMALL LESSONS ON GREAT TRUTHS. Fcap. Svo. is. 6d. Parkinson (John). PARADISI IN SOLE PARADISUS TERRESTRIS, OR A GARDEN OF ALL SORTS OF PLEASANT FLOWERS.
Page 56 - Contains descriptions of the seed-plants, ferns and fern-allies growing naturally in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida,, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, and the Indian Territory, and in Oklahoma and Texas east of the one-hundredth meridian.
Page 241 - ... made by J. Macoun on the Pacific Coast of North America, and preserved in the British Museum. The list is illustrated by twenty plates, which often give figures of structure, most useful in determination. The Mosses, exclusive of Sphagna, were worked out by J. Cardot and I. The'riot, and the list of them here published is augmented by the inclusion of records made by previous collectors. The number of mosses enumerated in the present paper is 280, of which 124 are new to Alaska, and 46 are new...
Page 127 - are desirous of forming a society for the cultivation of the science of natural history in all its branches, and more especially of the natural history of Great Britain and Ireland...
Page 859 - For the purchase of the museum or collection of Sir Hans Sloane, and of the Harleian collection of manuscripts, and for providing one general repository for the better reception and more convenient use of the said collections, and of the famous Cotton library, and of the additions made and to be made thereto.
Page 280 - At ordinary temperatures 1 part of copper sulphate to 100,000 parts of water destroys typhoid and cholera germs in from three to four hours. The ease with which the sulphate can then be eliminated from the water seems to offer a practical method of sterilizing large bodies of water, when this becomes necessary.
Page 153 - ... name or by its species, is the type or the origin of the group, the name is reserved for that part of it. If there is no such section or subdivision, but one of the parts detached contains, however, a great many more species than the others, it is to that part that the original name is to be applied. Art. 55. In case two or more groups of the same nature are united into one, the name of the oldest is preserved. If the names are of the same date, the author chooses. Art. 56. When a species is...
Page 892 - Bye -Laws should be voted upon, as a whole, and on that basis the ballot would be taken. The result was, in favour 72, against 4 ; whereupon the President declared the new Bye-Laws to be confirmed by a large majority. Mr.
Page 280 - ... to destroy or prevent their appearance. The mode of application makes this method applicable to reservoirs of all kinds, pleasure ponds and lakes, fish ponds, oyster beds, watercress beds, etc. It is also probable that the method can be used for the destruction of mosquito larvae.
Page 159 - Probably no one book gives so much general information in so small a compass, and we gladly recommend it both as a text-book for students and as a work of reference.

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