Port Arthur, the Siege and Capitulation (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1906 - Lüshun (China) - 511 pages
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"It has been my endeavour in the following pages to describe the Siege of Port Arthur. I joined the Third Army at the commencement of August 1904, just before the first assault, remained attached to General Nogi's headquarters until January 17, 1905, and entered the fortress with the victorious Japanese. An account written by an eye-witness who has not had access to official documents can harldy be considered complete or final. Whether these will ever be given to the world is a matter of great doubt, because the story of Port Arthur is such a tragedy to Japanese arms from beginning to end that the Headquarters Staff are not likely -- at least, until the present generation has passed away -- to admit the faulty tactics which an official history of the Siege would disclose"--Preface.
  

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Page 330 - There were practically no bodies intact; the hillside was carpeted with odd limbs, skulls, pieces of flesh, and the shapeless trunks of what had once been human beings, intermingled with pieces of shells, broken rifles, twisted bayonets, grenades, and masses of rock loosed from the surface by the explosions."2 What was the cost in human flesh?
Page 419 - I, Nogi Maresuke, commander-in-chief of the Third Imperial Army before Port Arthur, celebrate with sake and many offerings a fete in honor of you. ... I wish to tell you that your noble sacrifice has not been in vain, for the enemy's fleet has been destroyed, and Port Arthur has at last surrendered. I, Nogi Maresuke, took oath with you to conquer or seek oblivion in death. I have survived to receive the Imperial thanks, but I will not monopolize the glory. With you, Spirits of the Dead, who achieved...
Page 109 - The storm was what is called in the mountains a pouderie, and so blinding that it was impossible to see more than a few yards ahead at any time. Night overtook us as we reached the ridge. The wind had blown the snow away and travelling was much easier in consequence. Our Indian guide led us to a sheltered place in the bad lands, where we encamped in a snug thicket of dry ash. The moment we gained the friendly refuge of the encircling...
Page 328 - would have been an ideal spot for a Peace Conference. There have probably never been so many dead crowded into so small a space since the French stormed the great redoubt at Borodino. . . . The Japanese are horrible to look at when dead, for their complexion turns quite green, which gives them an unnatural appearance. . . . There were practically no bodies intact; the hillside was carpeted with odd limbs, skulls, pieces of flesh, and the shapeless trunks of what had once been human...
Page 189 - The reason for this state of affairs was to be found in the long and determined nature of the struggle, in unavoidable misunderstandings, and in the fear that any concession to the suffering might lead to the exposure or capture of important positions in the chain of defence.
Page 407 - Tsar's warrior, was left wandering about, and would have missed the train had not General Nogi's ADC, Captain Matsuada, cleared out some of the soldiers and found room for her in a truck. Then, with a last whistle, the train slowly moved off, carrying with it the true cause of Russia's downfall in the Far East, and leaving seated on the platform, to await for hours the arrival of the next train, the majority of the women and children. It was a miserable scene, and dissipated the last remaining feeling...
Page 419 - ... commander-in-chief of the Third Imperial Army before Port Arthur, celebrate with sake and many offerings a fete in honor of you. ... I wish to tell you that your noble sacrifice has not been in vain, for the enemy's fleet has been destroyed, and Port Arthur has at last surrendered. I, Nogi Maresuke, took oath with you to conquer or seek oblivion in death. I have survived to receive the Imperial thanks, but I will not monopolize the glory. With you, Spirits of the Dead, who achieved this great...
Page 356 - a single prisoner was taken — the usual one, who was always preserved after each attack to give information as to the condition of Port Arthur.
Page 185 - ... all the facts connected with it, he himself having been the chief electrician in the fortress, and having obtained permission to make the experiment. The wire was placed among the ordinary wire entanglements, so that it could not be discovered. The current was sufficiently strong to destroy any one touching it.
Page 410 - Entry 4 1 1 such a long time had elapsed since it had been required. The efforts made by the stubborn little infantrymen to conquer once more the intricacies of the German goose-step were often as ludicrous as their endeavours to keep step and march in line.

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