Speeches and Writings 1832-1858: Speeches, Letters, and Miscellaneous Writings : the Lincoln-Douglas Debates, Volume 1

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Library of America, 1989 - Illinois - 898 pages
12 Reviews
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Review: Lincoln: Speeches and Writings, 1859-1865 (Library of America #46)

User Review  - Winter Rose - Goodreads

When You Get Discouraged Read Lincoln! Read full review

Review: Lincoln: Speeches and Writings, 1859-1865 (Library of America #46)

User Review  - Preston Malone - Goodreads

ditto from volume I Read full review

Contents

Dcnotcs verbatim newspaper accounts of speeches reprinted here in full that
5
knmntobeincmpUtc
13
Protest in the Illinois Legislature on Slavery
18
Second Reply to James Adams October 18 1837
27
To Mrs Orville H Browning April 1 1838
37
Speech on the SubTreasury at Springfield Illinois
46
Plan of Campaign in 1840 c January 1840
65
Springfield Illinois February 22 184 2
81
Speech to the Scott Club of Springfield Illinois
273
To Charles R Welles September 27 1852
297
Fragment on Slavery 1854?
303
Portion of Speech at Republican Banquet in Chicago
385
To ames W Grimes after August 14 1857
403
On the Republican Party c November 1857 4 11
419
To Stephen A Hurlbut June 1 18s8
423
To John L Scripps June 23 18s8
434

1b josbua F Speed February 2 184 2
90
The Rebeeea Letter August 27 184 2
96
Duel Instructions to Elias H Merryman
102
To Martin S Morris April 14 1843
108
Protest in the Illinois Lecture on Slavery
110
To Henry E Dummer November 18 184s
113
To Benjamin F James February 9 1846
129
To Joshua F Speed October 221846
143
Spot3 Resolutions in the U S House of Representatives
158
r I105
171
Internal Improvements une 20 1848
187
I? William H Herndon une 22 1848
199
Speech in the U S House of Representatives on
205
I? William Schouler August 28 1848
221
To Walter Davis January 1849
225
To Charles R Welles February 20 1849
231
To Josiah B Herrick June 3 1849
237
To George W Rives December 1s 1849
243
To john D johnston january 12 I851
255
To Gustave P Koerner July 1s 18s8
459
To John Mathers July 20 18s8
479
To Henry E Dummer August s 18s8
485
First LincolnDouglas Debate Ottawa Illinois
495
Tb oseph O Cunningham August 22 1858
536
Portion of Speech at Edwardsville Illinois
580
Third LincolnDouglas Debate onesboro Illinois
586
To Ozias M Hatch March 24 1858 420
635
Tb Norman B udd September 23 1858
684
Sixth LincolnDouglas Debate Quincy Illinois
730
Seventh LincolnDouglas Debate Alton Illinois
774
Tb ames N Brown October 18 1858
822
Portion of Last Speech in Campaign of 1858
826
To Charles H Ray November 20 1858
832
To Mary S Owens May 7 1837
838
Note on the Texts
853
Index
877
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Ronald Dworkin
Arthur Ripstein
Limited preview - 2007

About the author (1989)

Abraham Lincoln was born in a log cabin in Kentucky in 1809 and was largely self-educated. As his family moved to Indiana and then Illinois, he worked as a hired hand, clerk, and surveyor until, in his twenties, he began to study law. He was elected to the Illinois House of Representatives in 1834. After marrying Mary Todd, Lincoln set up his own law practice and was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1846. As a candidate for the U.S. Senate in 1858, he debated Senator Stephen A. Douglas across the state and became a national figure. Nominated for president by the Republican Party, Lincoln was elected in November 1860 and took office in March 1861. Commander in chief of the Union forces during the Civil War, he issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. Reelected in 1864, Abraham Lincoln was shot to death by an embittered Southern actor, John Wilkes Booth, in April 1865, five days after General Lee's surrender at Appomattox.
Allen C. Guelzo is Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era and Director of Civil War Era Studies at Gettysburg College. He is the author of A Very Short Introduction: Lincoln, as well as two winners of the Lincoln Prize: Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America and Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President.
Richard Beeman
, the John Welsh Centennial Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, has previously served as the Chair of the Department of History, Associate Dean in Penn's School of Arts and Sciences, and Dean of the College of Arts of Sciences. He serves as a trustee of the National Constitution Center and on the center's executive committee. Author of seven previous books, among them The Penguin Guide to the United States Constitution and Plain Honest Men: The Making of the American Constitution, Professor Beeman has received numerous grants and awards including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, and the Huntington Library. His biography of Patrick Henry was a finalist for the National Book Award. 

Bibliographic information