Iran: A People Interrupted

Front Cover
New Press, 2008 - History - 324 pages
7 Reviews
A deeply informed political and cultural narrative of a country thrust into the international spotlight. Praised by leading academics in the field as "extraordinary," "a brilliant analysis," "fresh, provocative and iconoclastic,"Iran: A People Interruptedhas distinguished itself as a major work that has single-handedly effected a revolution in the field of Iranian studies. In this provocative and unprecedented book, Hamid Dabashi—the internationally renowned cultural critic and scholar of Iranian history and Islamic culture—traces the story of Iran over the past two centuries with unparalleled analysis of the key events, cultural trends, and political developments leading up to the collapse of the reform movement and the emergence of the new and combative presidency of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Written in the author's characteristically lively and combative prose,Irancombines "delightful vignettes" (Publishers Weekly) from Dabashi's Iranian childhood and sharp, insightful readings of its contemporary history. In an era of escalating tensions in the Middle East, his defiant moral voice and eloquent account of a national struggle for freedom and democracy against the overwhelming backdrop of U.S. military hegemony fills a crucial gap in our understanding of this country.

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The author of this book is a pseudo-intellectual coward who has taken part in my political oppression in America, by siding with the fascist professor Roy Mottahedeh at Harvard, who was a defendant in my civil rights law suit in a federal court. Dabashi and other friends of Mottahedeh's repressive circle have interrupted my academic life and should be reprimanded for their unethical and cowardly acts.
Kaveh Afrasiabi, Ph.D.
 

Review: Iran: A People Interrupted

User Review  - Colleen Mcclowry - Goodreads

This wasn't a page turner in the least bit. The book is highly academic. It uses just about every social science buzz word you can think of, sometimes in one long-winded sentence. Once you get past ... Read full review

Contents

On Nations Without Borders
12
The Dawn of Colonial Modernity
32
A Constitutional Revolution
67
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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