The Latin Poems

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Bucknell University Press, 2005 - Poetry - 153 pages
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This edition of Johnson's Latin Poems contains a Preface and Introduction followed by text, translation (prose), and brief notes on the poems. Several corrections have been made to the standard text. The notes deal with the obscurities and provide comment on style and treatment. It is often interesting to see how Johnson uses his Latin sources, especially Horace, to add a dimension to his meaning. There are numerous links with familiar episodes in Johnson's life, e.g., his trip to the Hebrides, the revision of his dictionary, his recovery from illness; and there are instances (notable in the anguished appeals for mercy in his prayers), where the more distant Latin form enables Johnson to say things about himself that he would never have expressed in English. The reader will find new details added to the well-loved portrait.

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Contents

Preface
7
Early Poems
15
Poems 17381749
34
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Jack Lynch, a Johnson scholar and professor of English at Rutgers University, is the editor of "Samuel Johnson's Dictionary" and the author of "The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson,"

Niall Rudd is Emeritus Professor of Latin at Bristol University. He has previously translated Juvenal's Satires for Oxford World's Classics. Jonathan Powell is Professor of Latin at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He is preparing a new text of De Republica and De Legibus for the Oxford
Classical Texts series.

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