An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Clarendon Press, 1894 - Knowledge, Theory of
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Review: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

User Review  - Killer Rabbit - Goodreads

Impressive run, but takes a digger on final fence. Reading early philosophy books by people with mathematical training always feels like I'm watching a steeplechase. The writer canters away from the ... Read full review

Review: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

User Review  - Xandri Fiori - Goodreads

For a philosophical work, this is probably one of the least incisive, or at least unusually sloppy. Certainly Locke is intelligent but his terms shift, assume themselves (what is up with primary ... Read full review

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Page 379 - Who will render to every man according to his deeds: To them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory and honour and immortality, eternal life : But unto them that are contentious, and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, indignation and wrath, Tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil...
Page 31 - It is of great use to the sailor, to know the length of his line, though he cannot with it fathom all the depths of the ocean. It is well he knows, that it is long enough to reach the bottom, at such places as are necessary to direct his voyage, and caution him against running upon shoals that may ruin him. Our business here is not to know all things, but those which concern our conduct.
Page lvi - Our business here is not to know all things, but those which concern our conduct. If we can find out those measures whereby a rational creature, put in that state which man is in in this world, may and ought to govern his opinions and actions depending thereon, we need not be troubled that some other things escape our knowledge.
Page 124 - I would be understood to mean that notice which the mind takes of its own operations, and the manner of them; by reason whereof there come to be ideas of these operations in the understanding-.
Page 145 - When the understanding is once stored with these simple ideas, it has the power to repeat, compare, and unite them, even to an almost infinite variety, and so can make at pleasure new complex ideas. But it is not in the power of the most exalted wit, or enlarged understanding, by any quickness or variety of thought, to invent or frame one new simple idea in the mind, not taken in by the ways before mentioned: nor can any force of the understanding destroy those that are there.
Page 531 - The ideas of -goblins and sprites have really no more to do with darkness than light : yet let but a foolish maid inculcate these often on the mind of a child, and raise them there together, possibly he shall never be able to separate them again so long as he lives ; but darkness shall ever afterwards bring with it those frightful ideas, and they shall be so joined, that he can no more bear the one than the other.
Page 28 - If by this inquiry into the nature of the understanding, I can discover the powers thereof; how far they reach; to what things they are in any degree proportionate; and where they fail us, I suppose it may be of use to prevail with the busy mind of man to be more cautious in meddling with things exceeding its comprehension; to stop when it is at the utmost extent of its tether; and to sit down in a quiet ignorance of those tilings which, upon examination, are found to be beyond the reach of our capacities.
Page 169 - Qualities thus considered in bodies are, first such as are utterly inseparable from the body, in what estate soever it be; such as in all the alterations and changes it suffers, all the force can be used upon it, it constantly keeps; and such as sense constantly finds in every particle of matter, which has bulk enough to be perceived, and the mind finds inseparable from every particle of matter, though less than to make itself singly be perceived by our senses.
Page 241 - In short, the practically cognized present is no knife-edge, but a saddle-back, with a certain breadth of its own on which we sit perched, and from which we look in two directions into time. The unit of composition of our perception of time is a duration, with a bow and a stern, as it were - a rearward- and a forward-looking end.
Page 123 - This source of ideas every man has wholly in himself : and though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects, yet it is very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense.

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