Hagiography and the Cult of Saints: The Diocese of Orléans, 800-1200

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 24, 2005 - History - 364 pages
1 Review
This is a study of the place of patron saints in Frankish society during the Carolingian and early Capetian periods. The book focuses on the composition of works in praise of dead holy people - hagiography - and the veneration of their physical remains - the cult of saints. It examines the patrons of a single diocese, Orléans, because a saint's power of patronage was defined in terms of a particular locale. Beyond the documentation of this region's textual and institutional traditions, the book explores the uses made of sanctity and patronage by the Franks. These so-called 'fathers' protected monasteries against interference by ecclesiastical and secular authorities. Moreover, as inhabitants of God's court of heaven, these 'fathers' served monks and laypeople as intercessors with God in matters of sin and disease. Thus they provided, in the Orléanais and elsewhere, an important source of power and authority, as well as an aspect of Christian belief which was shared by clergy and laity.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE CAROLINGIAN PERIOD
20
THE CAPETIAN PERIOD
58
FORMATION IMITATION
102
THE POSTHUMOUS PATRONAGE OF THE SAINTS
135
SAINTLY PATRONAGE AND EPISCOPAL AUTHORITY
202
SAINTS ABBOTS AND ECCLESIASTICAL POLITICS
235
conclusion
282
Bibliography and references
296
Index
331
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

Thomas Head is Assistant Professor of History at Washington University in St. Louis and the author of Hagiography and the Cult of the Saints: The Diocese of Orleans, 800-1200 (1990).

Bibliographic information