A Staff Officer's Scrap-book During the Russo-Japanese War, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Page 13 - I mean also that it is the foundation of all the high virtues and faculties of men. It was very strange to me to discover this ; and very dreadful — but I saw it to be quite an undeniable fact. The common notion that peace and the virtues of civil life flourished . together, I found, to be wholly untenable. Peace and the I vices of civil life only flourish together.
Page 203 - Ever honoured, ever sung ; Stained with blood of lusty grapes, In a thousand lusty shapes. Dance upon the mazer's brim, $ In the crimson liquor swim ; From thy plenteous hand divine Let a river run with wine ; God of youth, let this day here Enter neither care nor fear...
Page 13 - ... There is no art among a shepherd people, if it remains at peace. There is no art among an agricultural people, if it remains at peace. Commerce •is barely consistent with fine art; but cannot produce it. Manufacture not only is unable to produce it, but invariably destroys whatever seeds of it exist. There is no great art possible to a nation but that Which is based on battle.
Page 14 - I found, in brief, that all great nations learned their truth of word, and strength of thought, in war ; that they were nourished in war, and wasted by peace; taught by war, and deceived by peace ; trained by war, and betrayed by peace ; — in a word, that they were born in war, and expired in peace.
Page 13 - I found that those were not the words which the muse of history coupled together; that on her lips the words were — peace, and sensuality — peace, and selfishness — peace, and death. I found, in brief, that all great nations learned their truth of word, and strength of thought, in war; that they were nourished in war and wasted in peace; taught by war and deceived by peace; trained by war and betrayed by peace; in a word, that they were born in war and expired in peace.
Page 13 - The common notion that peace and the virtues of civil life flourished together, I found, to be wholly untenable. Peace and the vices of civil life only flourish together. We talk of peace and learning, and of peace and plenty, and of peace and civilisation ; but I found that those were not the words which the Muse of History coupled together : that on her lips, the words were—peace and sensuality, peace and selfishness, peace and corruption, peace and death.
Page iv - Gooch put it, in the chaos of the battlefield there is the tendency of all ranks to combine and recast the story of their achievements into a shape which shall satisfy the susceptibilities of national and regimental vainglory. ... On the actual day of battle naked truths may be picked up for the asking; by the following morning they have already begun to get into their uniforms.
Page 7 - There is material in the north of India, sufficient and fit, under good leadership, to shake the artificial society of Europe to its foundations if once it dares to tamper with that militarism which now alone supplies it with any higher ideal than money and the luxury which that money can purchase.
Page 115 - The Grape that can with Logic absolute The Two-and-Seventy jarring Sects confute : The subtle Alchemist that in a Trice Life's leaden Metal into Gold transmute.
Page 135 - ... an egotistic preference for their own special modes of proof. But, looking at the question as one of prudence, it would be wise in them, whatever else they give up, not to part company with the Design argument. For, in the first place, it is the best ; and besides, it is by far the most persuasive. It would be difficult to find a stronger argument in favour of Theism, than that the eye must have been made by one who sees, and the ear by one who hears.

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